Coccidiosis question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by amandac, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. amandac

    amandac Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 7, 2010
    Hi. I am fairly new to chickens and have a mixed flock of six, BSL, BR, GC and RIR. My girls are in an enclosed run, about 80 square feet. I have not treated for Coccidiosis, but and consistently reading that it is found in ALL soil. I was wondering if everyone else does preventative treatment or do you wait for a problem? Also, can you find the necessary treatments at Tracotr Supply? My local vets do not seem to treat chickens. Thanks in advance for the imput. [​IMG]
     
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    They will gain a natural immunity to it as chicks, you don't have to do anything. The only problems arise when the concentration in the soil gets so high that they get sick from eating the oocysts (such as when coops are not cleaned/high concentration of poop/favorable wet runs which facilitate their hibernation as oocysts in the ground) and not exposing chicks early enough to the soil, regardless if they are on medicated (prevents cocci from reproducing in the gut) or unmedicated feed.

    Nothing to worry about. I have only treated cocci once in 10+ years, and have never wormed or given vaccinations.
     
  3. eggsited chickens

    eggsited chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cocci usually affects chicks, that is why their is medicated chick feed. I have never used a medicated feed and haven't had a problem with it. If I did I would use corrid in the water to treat it.
     
  4. spish

    spish De Regenboog Kippetjes

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    i, on the other hand, have terrible trouble with cocci (lost 5 chickens at least this year to it, seems to be high levels in our soil)

    i use a preventative now in their water, for three days every 1-2 months they receive esb-3.

    touch wood since then no more cocci outbreaks (we live alongside a river and the fields are always waterlogged crossed with the humid belgian weather...perfect breeding ground for cocci)
    i put chicks out as early as possible to try and build up their immunity... am hoping it works!
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2010
  5. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011
  6. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My preventative treatment is to NOT use medicated feed and to put chicks on soil from about day 2 - or if weather does not permit this, to put soil in the brooder, immediately to let them begin being exposed to the oocycsts. I have not had another outbreak of cocci since i started doing this. When i used to use medicated feed, etc., i always had cocci issues.

    If i did have an outbreak, i would medicate immediately with Corid, which i keep on hand just in case. I would absolutely not follow up a 5-7 day treatment of Corid with Sulmet or more Corid. That's overkill, in my opinion, would be very hard on a chick's system, and is unnecessary.
     
  7. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Quote:Ohhhh I'm going to have to try the soil in the brooder procedure next time I get chicks! I have TWICE treated my same flock for coccidiosis (because of actual runny blood in the stools both times and one death). Horrible disease.
     
  8. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Quote:It is a thiamine blocker which affects the cocci protozoa more so than the chickens as it inhibits their reproduction. Thiamine is one of the four nucleic acids in DNA, and because cocci has a much faster reproductive cycle, it effectively stops them from reproducing, while the chick, is larger, cell cycle is slower, and the ratio of the thiamine analog taken up is not high enough to cause any significant damage to the bird.


    As for med vs not med feed. It does one no good at all to give medicated feed and NOT expose birds at the same time to the soil. You need to give medicated feed AND exposure. Without the exposure early on, like day 2, the medication just goes though the bird with no effects.

    Humid soil and damp grounds are indeed the optimal storage conditions for cocci oocysts. They survive longer thus can build up. Being closer to wildlife, can also bring in new strains to the soil and help keep their numbers high. The protozoa only replicates inside birds.
     
  9. amandac

    amandac Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 7, 2010
    Thanks so much for all the input! My chicks were older when I got them, probably 2 months old, but I have had them all since May with no problems. You all have put my worries at ease. Thanks again!
     
  10. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011

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