Coccidiosis Question!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jbpatwood, Aug 19, 2011.

  1. jbpatwood

    jbpatwood Out Of The Brooder

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    May 1, 2011
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    I just discovered late last evening that my birds are infected with coccidiosis. I have picked up some Corid, and have begun treating them. My question is this: I purchased four new chicks to add to my flock, and they are currently being quarantined. When is it officially okay to integrate them into my exisiting flock, and should they also be treated for cocci just in case? I have two young children who often go back and forth between the chickens. I know this isn't healthy, but kids will be kids.

    Thanks so much for your help!!!
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    You might want to set up a wash station and foot bath so they can wash hands and disinfect their shoes between coops. Make it a fun thing.
    Most people will probably tell you to treat all. Cocci is everywhere.
    After a couple week quarantine I would just make sure bedding is new, kept dry and keep feeders at least half full.
     
  3. jbpatwood

    jbpatwood Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much. That sounds great. We had antibacterial, but they sometimes forget. I'll make them wash EVERYTHING now:) This has been devastating. I'll begin treatment of the newbies pronto!
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Just because they have the protozoa that causes Cocci is not a cause to panic. There are different strains of the protozoa. At least one strain is obviously in your ground. It is always going to be there. That is important to remember. But chickens can develop an immunity to the specific strain of protozoa. That is actually what you want to happen. Young chicks can develop that immunity easier than older chickens. Immunity to one strain does not give them immunity to all strains. And older chickens seem to get hit harder with it than younger chickens, though it is a danger to all.

    It sounds like your older chickens are showing the symptoms of Cocci, so yes, you need to treat them. Once they get over this, they should be immune. That specific strain should not bother them again. How did it get there. Maybe an infected wild bird flew over and pooped. That's all it takes.

    The protozoa does not cause any problems unless the numbers get out of hand in the birds' intestines. If you keep the brooder, coop, and run dry, it is usually not a problem. Usually. If the brooder, coop, and run are wet, the protozoa can survive in wet manure and can get out of hand when the birds eat the poop. So if your young birds have been exposed, they may already have an immunity and you don't even know that they have that exposure. You don't want to treat them unless you see a problem. They need that protozoa to survive in their intestines in low numbers for two or three week so they can develop that immunity.

    What I would do in your situation (actually I do this each time I brood chicks) is take some damp dirt from the infected birds run and give that to the chicks to expose them to the protozoa so they can develop the immunity they need. Don't obsess about keeping your brooder bone dry, just don't let it get very damp. Of course, watch them closely for signs of a problem and be prepared to treat if necessary, but odds are you won't see a problem. And when they hit the ground where that protozoa is, they will have the immunity they need. Of course, when they hit the ground is another time you watch them closely for signs of a problem.

    Many of us have the protozoa that causes Cocci in the ground, especially in the Southeast where it is so hot and humid. It is usually not a problem unless it sets in real wet for a while. Don't get me wrong, Cocci can be serious and can kill chickens. But it is something you can control.

    Good luck!
     
  5. jbpatwood

    jbpatwood Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks Ridgerunner! That's great info! I won't treat the young ones then. My chickens have been free ranging for the past few weeks. The guy at the feed store says it's been really bad this year...everyone seems to have a problem with it. I'm guessing the humidity is causing it to thrive in the soil where we live this summer. I'll grab a patch of dirt and expose the babies to it. I have to admit...this makes me quite nervous. They aren't baby babies though...they just seem it to me. The little ones are about 15 weeks or so.

    I appreciate all your help!
     

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