Coccidiosis, Sulmet or Corrid?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by my3chickens, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. my3chickens

    my3chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    183
    0
    109
    Apr 24, 2010
    Maryland
    I had two chickens, slightly under 1 year old, die last year from Coccidiosis. The first passed away after being lethargic for a few days, the other had same symptoms & after spending $150.00 at vet passed away as well. I treated all surviving chickens with Sulmet. I believe another one has it now, started on Sulmet last night but have now been reading about Corrid. Any opinions on which one is better and any ideas on why this keeps happening? Very vigilant about keeping things clean and checking the girls regularly for any signs of illness.

    This chicken is just over 1 year old...
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,243
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Sulmet only treats 2 of the 9 types of cocci that chickens can get. Corid treats all 9 types. I recommend using corid.
     
  3. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

    3,495
    548
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Sulmet is too hard on the bird's system It contains sodium sulfamethazine. Sulfadimethoxine is much safer and kills Coccidia that Amprolium won't. I'd use Corid for 5 days at 1 tsp per gallon of water. Then run Probios and vitamins in the water for 3 days. If after that you see no symptoms, run Sulfadimethoxine powder at .5 tsp per gallon of water for 3 days only. That is what I do.

    BTW Dawg, I thought Corid (Amprolium) only was effective against E. zurnii and E. bovis strains of coccidia.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,243
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
    2 people like this.
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

    59,789
    18,110
    801
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    X2!
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

    59,789
    18,110
    801
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,243
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

    59,789
    18,110
    801
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    Those are bovine specific coccidia.

    Twelve Eimeria spp have been identified in the feces of cattle worldwide, but only 3 (E zuernii, E bovis, and E auburnensis) are most often associated with clinical disease. The other Eimeria spp have been shown experimentally to be mildly or moderately pathogenic but are not considered important pathogens.
     
  9. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

    3,495
    548
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Thanks. I've seen that site before. I might even have it bookmarked somewhere. It looks like we're stuck with Amprolium or Sulfa drugs. I had to refresh my memory. Here's another good source of coccidia info, especially Table 4 on this page: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/1138/coccidiosis-control

    Amprol is best for species that are caecal, and Sulfa drugs are best for the species which are intestinal:

    "Depending on the localization of lesions in intestines, the coccidioses are divided into caecal, induced by E. tenella, and small intestinal, induced by E. acervulina, E. brunetti, E. maxima, E. mitis, E. mivati, E. necatrix, E. praecox and E. nagani. In caecal coccidiosis, a marked typhlitis is present and haemorrhages are seen through the intestinal wall."
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
    2 people like this.
  10. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

    3,495
    548
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    I'll also add that generally the caecal types cause bloody droppings. The many other species of coccidia which attack the intestines don't always reveal blood. I used Corid (Amprol) in the past where it did not work. The sulfadimethoxine did. So to the newer folks, it is best to keep both anti-coccidia meds on hand; Amprolium and Sulfadimethoxine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by