coccidiosis won't go away

wleigh1021

Songster
Jan 16, 2016
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New Jersey
Back in April I had a necropsy done on one of my roo's that died. It was determined that I had a high concentration of coccidiosis and worms and it was possible but not definite that he had marek's. I disinfected the coop with DuPont Virkon multiple times and also later with an ammonia solution since I read that ammonia kills coccidia. I've also treated heavily with liquid corid multiple times (2 tbs/gal for 2 weeks then 1/2 tsp per gallon for 2 weeks). I clean their poop board every few days and keep a thin layer of food grade lime on it. I don't give them treats on the ground, and it's rare that I do give them treats at all. Their water is a nipple system so it stays clean and I make chicken tea with herbal supplements, green tea, turmeric, and garlic for their immune systems. I also expanded their run and give them field trips to the back yard when I can. It has been unusually wet this summer and even though their run has a roof it still gets wet from the sides which hasn't helped. I tired ACV in their water but found that they were still getting sick and they stay healthier instead with the tea. I dewormed them back in April and I can do so again soon (since I wanted to wait 6 months).

Is there anything else I can do to try and keep them healthy? I've lost about 6 birds in 8 months and this unending battle is starting to wear on my nerves. If there's nothing else that I can do, can I expect that new generations will develop better immunity if I breed birds that have never shown any signs of weakness?
 

Wyorp Rock

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Sep 20, 2015
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Southern N.C. Mountains
Back in April I had a necropsy done on one of my roo's that died. It was determined that I had a high concentration of coccidiosis and worms and it was possible but not definite that he had marek's. I disinfected the coop with DuPont Virkon multiple times and also later with an ammonia solution since I read that ammonia kills coccidia. I've also treated heavily with liquid corid multiple times (2 tbs/gal for 2 weeks then 1/2 tsp per gallon for 2 weeks). I clean their poop board every few days and keep a thin layer of food grade lime on it. I don't give them treats on the ground, and it's rare that I do give them treats at all. Their water is a nipple system so it stays clean and I make chicken tea with herbal supplements, green tea, turmeric, and garlic for their immune systems. I also expanded their run and give them field trips to the back yard when I can. It has been unusually wet this summer and even though their run has a roof it still gets wet from the sides which hasn't helped. I tired ACV in their water but found that they were still getting sick and they stay healthier instead with the tea. I dewormed them back in April and I can do so again soon (since I wanted to wait 6 months).

Is there anything else I can do to try and keep them healthy? I've lost about 6 birds in 8 months and this unending battle is starting to wear on my nerves. If there's nothing else that I can do, can I expect that new generations will develop better immunity if I breed birds that have never shown any signs of weakness?
Can you take some more stool samples in for testing?

Amprolium (Corid) does treat coccidiosis, but you may have encountered a resistant strain. Sulfa drugs may need to be used to get it under control. Sulfa drugs can be hard on the system, so the testing would be important if at all possible. It may be that you are dealing with something else besides Coccidiosis.
 

casportpony

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Sorry about your losses. :hugs

Lots of things you can try.

  1. Give Corid orally as suggested by @Chickencountryuk
  2. Give a sulfa drug as @Wyorp Rock suggested
  3. Give sulfa and Corid.
  4. Try toltrazuril (Baycox)
Questions
When you de-wormed in April, what wormer did you use, how much did you give, how did you give it, and how many days did you give it?

What worms were found in the necropsy?
 

wleigh1021

Songster
Jan 16, 2016
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New Jersey
I used ivermectin to deworm for capillary worms. I used a syringe and these pictures as a guide for dosage. http://pin.it/c7zsmqtua5eq2n

My state that did the necropsy did test fecal which is how the coccidia were found but they don't specify what strain so I doubt that another test would specify that. The woman I spoke with said that it's heavy in all soil in my area. She gave me a couple articles to read, but honestly they weren't that helpful and I did my best to get helpful information on here.

If I try other medications as recommended above, will I continue to have a problem due to heavy concentrations in the soil??

Thanks, as always I appreciate all the help and advice you all give me!
 

casportpony

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Phoenixxx

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Aug 8, 2012
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Boutilier's Point, Nova Scotia
I have found Molly's Herbals to be very effective on cocci and worms; with a serious bout of coccidiosis, though, treatment must be started immediately at the first sign, and use double the recommended dose.

Yes, DO breed the birds that survive! However, what's equally - or even more - important is to make sure the newly-hatched chicks get exposure to the land as soon as possible! I thought that I had actually bred immunity to cocci in my flock after 5 years without major symptoms, but then I gave a dozen hatching eggs to a school teacher. They were kept in a sterile environment for their first two weeks, and within days of getting the chicks back they all fell seriously ill! Any chicks that I hatch indoors go outside on the ground as early as 24-hours old for the daytimes. I have found that some may still get coccidiosis, but not until much later on (8 weeks or older) and if they do, it's rarely serious enough to warrant treatment. The only exceptions that I've encountered thus far were a batch of chantecler eggs that were shipped and my meat hybrid hybrid (commercial cornish x/barred rock) chicks - they wound up needing treatment.
 
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