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Cochin killed by owl - help on taking care of her best friend

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by huntersmommy611, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. huntersmommy611

    huntersmommy611 Out Of The Brooder

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    Our bantam Cochin was killed by an owl this evening - right at dusk. From her neck down was intact. We purchased her with an easter egger and they have been inseparable since last year. We have 4 bigger girls (barred rock and sex link) that don't really pay much attention to Easter. How can I make sure that she will be ok without her buddy. They roostef together, ate together, laid in nesting boxes together. I'm devestated by the loss. These girls are truly pets to us. Any advice would be welcome.
     
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Try getting a couple more pullets around her age. Bantam cochins of course would be ideal. It might work.

    Also... just mentioning this because it sounds like you think the owl was just killing for pleasure. It wasn't... that is just the way raptors eat..in fact, you can always tell when a hawk or owl killed a chicken because they almost always take the head and leave everything else.

    Try getting some old cd's and hang them together along with some glittery ribbon or anything so that they spin, sparkle, and flash. Hang them near where your chickens would run for cover if they were running from a predator, and anywhere where the flock hangs out a lot. The spinning, flashing cd's help to discourage hawks and owls from stalking your flock. You can also use a wind spinner, but I think the cd's work better and are certainly cheaper. We also use bird bombs to help discourage hawks once in a while..you have to go through some paperwork usually to get the those, but they are an effective way to discourage predators without doing any harm to them. Of course, they don't work as well for owls, but if your flock goes inside at night, owls should not be a big problem.

    I'm sorry for your loss...and Easter's...but she will be ok, and getting her a couple of new young friends would be what I would try first. Of course, you have to quarantine the new ones for a while..but she would still be aware they were there.

    Best of luck going forward. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  3. mustangrooster

    mustangrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    Im so very sorry for your loss [​IMG]Thats just a terrible thing to of happened.

    I apologize i cannot really help..but im sure others will be able too...[​IMG]

    -Mustang
     
  4. huntersmommy611

    huntersmommy611 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! We have plans to put a bunch of shiny stuff in the yard for when we do allow them out of their house (only when we are home now). Also putting lots of play type things in their house and run.
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Sorry for your loss.
    Losing a flock member can be stressful....but so is adding more birds.
    Your bird will be fine, just let her work it out.
    That owl will be back for more, only a secure strong metal mesh topped run will guarantee it doesn't get another one.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2017
  6. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    That is not necessarily true. Being in an enclosed run can present it's own set of problems. We have had chickens for 11 years and we have only had one (an old rooster) ever killed by an owl.
    Same circumstances, he was just out when it was starting to get dark. In his case, he was old, which didn't help. Although we do occasionally lose one to a predator of any kind, it is rare.
    And we live in the woods, so we have plenty around. It's just a question of diligence and using prevention methods. Being at home does help..I have a home office and my husband is retired, so we are usually home and paying attention to what is going on outside. On the other hand, if a fox, or dog, or any predator..finds it's way into an enclosed run...well...there are not many survivors. To each his own, just saying there are advantages to both.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2017
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  8. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sure I understand that but that is what the OP said she is doing, anyhow. The owl that killed our sweet rooster never came back, but I'm not sure why not.
     
  9. huntersmommy611

    huntersmommy611 Out Of The Brooder

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    They have an amazing coop with a covered run. Enclosed in 1 inch hardware mesh on all sides (except the bottom). The girls usually free range during the day and are put up at night. EC is the smallest of the 5 now and she is being bullied horribly. I brought her in the house and am keeping her in the bathroom until I can figure out a way to introduce her back into the 4 bigger girls flock. She and Penelope (the cochin) were their own flock. They didn't hang with the big girls (lol). We have put up night sensors and cds hanging from their favorite hang out area. They were allowed to free range for a while yesterday while my son was at home.
     
  10. Poultry4Life

    Poultry4Life Just Hatched

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    I recommend getting another easter around its age and of the opposite sex.
     

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