Cockatiels outside-- cold tolerance?

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Finches, Canaries, Cockatiels, Parro' started by USAmma, Nov 2, 2013.

  1. USAmma

    USAmma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in the Phoenix area and it can sometimes get down to freezing at night. But mostly we have mild winters 60's during the day and 40's at night. We have hot, hot summers. A neighbor who has since moved away had 'tiels in aviaries all year long outside. So what is the coldest they can go without a heat lamp?
     
  2. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

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    i dont know exact temp but i do know they have to be acclimated to the cold. if they are put outside in late summer then as temps cool they get used to it but to take them from 80 to 40 would hurt them
     
  3. USAmma

    USAmma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. They are enjoying the daytime outside right now and I'm bringing them in at night. :)
     
  4. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

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    i would be afraid to tell you yes or no in case something did happen, you need a heat light and a guinea pig, so to speak to know for sure
     
  5. Rosa moschata

    Rosa moschata Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There's more involved than can be known from the information presented. Was there a night-shelter that was wind-proof? Did the cockatiels roost in nest boxes at night? Was the aviary sharing the wall with the house? These are just three factors that can increase the birds' abilities to handle cold outdoor temperatures. And remember that a lone bird out there as a "guinea pig" won't have the benefit of snuggling up to a partner for warmth at night. In any case, if you plan to keep birds outdoors year-round, it's something they must get used to in Spring and not this time of year. Consider increasing the calorie content of their feed as cold weather approaches -- an increase of 5-10% of oil-seeds in their mix, for example. Another thing that can help is a deep layer of mulch in a wind-proof night shelter. As long as the aviary is not heavily stocked with birds, and a fresh layer of mulch is added through the year, you can almost think of something like the "deep-bedding" method used in hen houses, and in Winter, the breakdown of the mulch can generate some more heat. But, of course, make sure that ventilation is provided again in this section when the weather warms.

    Of course, the best source of information would be to see if there are local cage-bird clubs and/or breeders in YOUR area, and see what they do about keeping birds outside year-round. And seek information about outdoor aviaries for cage-birds on other websites that focus more on that area than this one does. While there are a lot of people that come to this site, the majority don't have a lot of cage-bird information -- and even fewer of those are familiar with what works where you live. I would say to keep bringing them in at night for now, learn what you'd need to set up for year-round outdoor care, and start planning to try that in the Spring. Good luck.

    :)
     
  6. Poultrybonkers

    Poultrybonkers Overrun With Chickens

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    My tiels live outside and it gets to the negatives here im not using any heat lamps as i not paying extra for electricity.
     
  7. Tony K T

    Tony K T Overrun With Chickens

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    Mine also live outside yearround.They have 3 babies in the nest right now almost ready to fledge.Temps get down to the teens here in N.H.Their aviary is fully covered in poly for the winter months,but there is no heat provided.There's pic of my aviary that house my pheasants,tiuels and diamond doves.I have since left the bottom 3'of the pheasants pens open.
    In N.H.,Tony.
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