Cockerel thumps/kicks our legs sometimes- does anyone else have this?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by beanmcnulty, Aug 30, 2011.

  1. beanmcnulty

    beanmcnulty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 10, 2011
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    Hi! We have a 5 month old BO cockerel (Boo Boo Chicken as my 3 year old has seemed to name him) he is the only one his age (have other ~14 week old Dels coming up but in other housing), so far he has been very "tolerant" of my daughter messing with his girls, but once in awhile he will kick the backs of my husband's and my legs when our backs are turned (cheap shot:)). Doesnt hurt at all, just surprising. I couldnt find anyone else describing this on the forum. I just worry it is a prelude to something worse! I dont think my husband (and probably myself included) would tolerate anything worse, he would sadly have to go. Would be a shame since he was the biggest of the hatchery boys I got early this spring. Maybe there would be something to "nip it in the bud"?? Thanks!
     
  2. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    I don't tolerate any roo that is flogging anyone. But one at five months, you better nip it in the bid before he can do some real damage. Pick him up, carry him around when you do your chores. He would be upset but it would probably benefit him. If you can not handle him or think you can not afford the risk, time to send him to a good home.

    Once he gets spurs, it is going to hurt and your daughter will get hurt badly...or even worse, the loss of her eye. Those buggers know when they can go on one on one with humans, then it would not look good for him.
     
  3. beanmcnulty

    beanmcnulty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I will try picking him up, he is really big though it should be comical! Seriously sometimes I wonder if he got some CX heritage at some point! I might be able to set up my electric fencing (once I get it) so that they are all kept in their own space and not free range all the time like they are now. That may be the only way to save him:/
     
  4. BlackBrookPoultry

    BlackBrookPoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had a cockerel doing the same thing for a while. One day he got me hard. I picked him up and held him upside down by the legs for about 5 minutes while I fed the other chickens. He never attacked me (or any other person again). I think when they attack and people kick them it just simulates what another rooster would do. When they get scooped up and hung by their legs that just blows their mind!
     
  5. beanmcnulty

    beanmcnulty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Aha think I will have hubby do that- he would be happy to I'm sure- and I'll tell him to not punt him like he has been threatening:)
     
  6. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    That is the beginning of agressive behavior. Sadly, alot of rooster become aggressive at that age, one those male hormones hit. I've had to get rid of some really mean roosters, and it seem like that's always how it starts--the cheap shot from behind.

    If you pick them up and hold them up-side-down by their legs, sometimes that will show them who is boss. Or stick them under your arm and walk around with them for a while (sometimes they're too big to do that, and it's not a good idea to do that if they bite). I used to keep a rolled up magazine (held together with duct tape) in my back pocket, and then I could wack them without really hurting them if they showed agression towards me.

    I like to be able to enjoy my chickens though, so if they get too carried away with attacking me, they end up on the menu! Great soup! [​IMG]
     
  7. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There's a thread entitled "Weird Dance" that I think is in the behavior forum or maybe Managing Your Flock. The weird dance is mating behavior but it also gets into challenging rooster behavior, which one of my Silkie roos has engaged in with me - sideways skittering with a puffed-up look. The first time he jumped toward me I grabbed his butt up and practiced a little "corporeal cuddling." He never jumped at me again but still skittered so I would always grab him up, even if it meant pulling him up by the tail feathers into my arms. His reaction is pretty amusing and gratifying. He hates it! Takes the wind out of his sails. Now he stays out of my way. Check out that thread. There are some very helpful posts.
     
  8. beanmcnulty

    beanmcnulty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:OK! If I could know he was coming, i would grab him, but so far it has always been a surprise, from behind thing.
     
  9. weeders n feeders

    weeders n feeders Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From another post here on BYC I learned to hold them down by placing a hand on their back then pinching their neck and push the head down until they relax and are completely submissive. This will usually take care of my 2nd in command roo (The first in command has never been aggressive toward me.) for about a month. If he shows any indication of wanting to do something or just not moving away from me the I walk him down- just walk slowly forcing him to move away from me for a minute or two. Definitely don't kick back that is like bickering with him and what you want to do is dominate him.
     
  10. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would look for him as soon as I got in the coop (or wherever they are). If he even comes near I would move toward him, not in an aggressive way, but in a stay-out-of-my-space way. Keep him in sight so he can't get behind you. Still scoop him up any chance you get. Don't know how long it will take to change his behavior but I guess you'll be able to tell after a few times of doing this. You and your family all have to do this and do it consistently.
     

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