Cold Weather Hardy Birds

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by MNHobbyFarm, Mar 28, 2012.

  1. MNHobbyFarm

    MNHobbyFarm New Egg

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    Mar 28, 2012
    Hello! I am going to be embarking on a chicken adventure. I would like to go into it well informed. I am located in Minnesota, and it can get very cold here in the winter. We are in the process of building a coop and run and should be done within the next week or so! I'd like to get some chickens, and I'd like to get some layers, and maybe a roo. I have 4 young children who I would like to also learn to help care for the birds as well as teach about where our food comes from, and thought raising layers would be a great way to do that as well.

    We live in the country and have a 15 acre hobby farm. I am excited to get chickens but am a bit overwhelmed with all the choices. I would like good layers, but they will also be pets, and would like something visually interesting. Egg color doesn't really matter but colors would be very neat for the kids.

    I figured I'd go to those who were knowlegeable and could steer me on the right path. Any and all help would be wonderful!
     
  2. M.sue

    M.sue Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2011
    Michigan
    Orpingtons tolerate the cold weather well and are good layers.
     
  3. Luckytaz

    Luckytaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2010
    Rogers, Mn.
    Welcome to the forum, Many breeds do well in Minnesota. My personal favorites are Buckeyes.
    Where are you located?
     
  4. MNHobbyFarm

    MNHobbyFarm New Egg

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    Mar 28, 2012
    I am just about 30 minutes north of the twin cities. We love it here. Far enough out for it to be quiet and rural, but still close enough to enjoy benefits of the cities.
     
  5. Luckytaz

    Luckytaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2010
    Rogers, Mn.
    Are you planning getting chicks or adult birds? How many do you plan on having?
     
  6. vjbakke

    vjbakke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2011
    MN
    I'm in MN as well. We have 4 Red sex links and 1 Dominique, They all did just fine this past winter in our fully insulated coop, went out in the run almost every day. We provided no heat in the coop this winter. We are getting 3 Easter Egger chicks soon, they tolerate the cold very well to. Most hatchery website will list breeds and say of they are heat and cold tolerant.
     
  7. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Barred rocks! Best all around breed :)

    Mine do very well in the cold climates of Eastern Canada!

    Welcome by the way! :welcome
     
  8. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    [​IMG] I think having a covered run would be important. I have yet to meet a chicken that liked the snow. This is about as much as any of mine will handle.
     
  9. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2010
    Marshfield, Ma.
    Most of the standard breeds do well in cold climate. Check the breed chart to try to match up what you are looking for but refers to each in general as they all have different personalities individually. I have RIRs,Barred, Cinnamon Queens,Golden Comets and Buff Orpingtons. Oh yeah a White Rock rooster. The Buffs by far are the most layed back mellow chickens I have ever seen. Two of them are always the last on the roost never in a rush to the food or treats, they just take the day as it comes. Handle really well.
     
  10. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    NEK, VT
    With a rooster you'll no doubt try hatching next spring. I'd suggest getting a nice heritage breed. So many to choose from and on the plus side it's easier to get rid of extra birds when they are from good lines. You'll also find that heritage lines tend to carry smaller combs than hatchery birds which is nice in winter. Wyandotte have a rose comb, developed in New York, so roosters are less prone to frost. We went with Blue Rocks but was a toss up as my partner is partial to the Silver laced Wyandotte. So many pretty and productive dual purpose breeds out there. I suggest picking the breed first then select what variety/color. We went for the blue as it hatches blue, black and splash chickens. Only keeping one breed and wanting to keep a heritage it seemed the way to have variety.
     

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