collecting or buy fertile eggs?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by hammered, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. hammered

    hammered New Egg

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    Oct 24, 2010
    My friend and I now both have our incubators.

    The farm with the birds is 4 hour drive north.
    We want to hatch the eggs here in the house and take he chicks back to he farm once they are bigger.

    What we need to know is collecting and transporting these eggs?

    Do they have to be collected and put in the incubator the same day they are hatched?
    Will the eggs go bad if they are not maintained at the 100' temp on the drive back?

    Any link to more info would be great.

    PS cool form and thanks.
     
  2. rebel yell

    rebel yell Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the eggs don't have to be warm before they go into the bator, just put them in a egg carton & try to avoid bumps on the way home & let them rest for about 4-6 hours before putting them in the bator & have your bator at temp. before you go get them, then set them & do the long wait thing.
     
  3. Cindiloohoo

    Cindiloohoo Quiet as a Church Mouse

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    They have to be put in the incubator within 10 days of being laid for the best results. I'd make sure they were snug in their cartons for the ride so that they do not bump together. Travelling with eggs decreases the hatchability rate of the eggs because it can damage the inner air cells, so minimize that possibility as much as you can by good packing for the trip. You DO NOT have to maintain 100 degrees temps for the trip. When the eggs are put in the incubator, the incubation process begins at 100 degrees. For the trip they should be kept dormant at less than 100 degrees...ideally they should be kept around 50-60 degrees, but for a 4 hour trip to the bator, they will be fine as long as they are not kept too hot or too cold. Also, I would "rest" the eggs for about 8 hours before putting them into the bator, so that the contents can settle inside the eggs. When you travel with them, the contents move around a good bit, so in order for the best chance of hatchability, give the contents time to settle some before the incubation process begins.
     

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