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Color question...again

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Sylverfly, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. Sylverfly

    Sylverfly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Cochin hen went broody in Jan sitting on 3 eggs and I brought her in tonight because the eggs were peeping well one is part way hatched I caught a glimpse when she scolded me for checking on her, lol. And to my surprise it was a blue silver colored chick with white feathers only saw the head and one wing so far. I'll get a better look when they are all hatched and dry. So whats up with that color my Cochin is white and I'm sure they are eggs laid by her, and daddy is a Cochin (partridge), or a blue copper maran. The Maran makes sense as far as the blue color I guess. But I was under the impression that blue was recessive and white was dominant so wouldn't the chick be white? Or am I wrong yet again.
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

  3. Sylverfly

    Sylverfly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting, this little guy was much darker almost black but it was still wet so maybe it will lighten up as it dries. I'll post a pic as soon as I can. Also I think its beak was black, the chicks in the video looked like they had pink(ish) beaks but maybe some chicks have dark beaks too? Do you know if white is usually dominant over other colors in Cochin?
     
  4. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Tempe, Arizona
    Blue is incompletely dominant; white in cochins is usually recessive. However, dominance really has no bearing between these two as they are different genes, and dominance is related to alternative variations of the same gene.

    The alleles for blue are blue (Bl) and not-blue (bl+). Blue is a diuter of black. If one blue gene and one not-blue gene is present, black pigment is diluted to blue; if two blue genes are present, black pigment is doubly diluted, to splash. If two not-blue genes are present, black pigment is not diluted. Whether or not white genes are present has no bearing.

    There are a number of alleles for recessive white, but the only common ones are no-colour (c) and colour (C+). If there are two no-colour genes present, pigment is not created, therefore pigment cannot be diluted or enhanced because it isn't there. Kind of like trying to divide the number zero: you can't have parts of nothing . [​IMG] Unless both copies of this gene are no-colour, creation of pigment is not affected.

    Dominant white (I) works differently than recessive white. Pigment is created, but the mechanism by which it is transported to the feathers are faulty. Kind of like a whole group is trying to get across town and the bus that was scheduled to take them broke down. Some might manage to find their way anyways, but most will be no-shows at their scheduled destination. Dominant white works predominantly on black pigment, with minimal affect on red pigment. There are several dominant white alleles; I only mentioned I as that is what you are concerned about.

    The base, or E-alleles present determine the primary distribution pattern of red and black pigment; however, other genes can modify this.
     
  6. Sylverfly

    Sylverfly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am always so impressed and amazed (in a good way) that people know this stuff, and are able to explain things in a way that I can follow and understand, lol. Do you mind me asking how you learned about all this? Did you go to school for this, your own research, or is it just experience with breedings coupled with detailed and organized record keeping? Also thanks guys, least I be rude and forget myself.
     
  7. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Tempe, Arizona
    I learned one gene at a time, and a huge lot of help from several mentors. Tim Adkerson (mentioned and quoted in the link from a few posts back) is fantastic on understanding and explaining how things work at a cellular level. Henk is also really good at explaining things, and if you lurk on Classroom-At-The-Coop, you can pick up a ton more from chicken genetics experts from all over the world.
     

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