Colours?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by MidnightGyps, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. MidnightGyps

    MidnightGyps Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 23, 2013
    I just recently bought a dozen fertile eggs (6 Wyandotte's and 6 Belgian Bantam's) and they have colours written on the eggs. I was wondering if it was even possible to definitely know the colours of the chicks inside? I've got Crele, Columbian, Mille Fleur, Porcelain, Mottle and some others. At least, with my not-so-extensive research that's what I've gotten as the lady was hard to understand and there's only letters on the eggs.

    And also is there a list of Wyandotte and Belgian Bantam colours somewhere? I've looked but there was not a good list for either of them.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  3. MidnightGyps

    MidnightGyps Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you, ChickenCanoe. You have to keep different colours together? I thought it was just breeds that had to be kept separated to prevent cross breeding.. Yeah, I'm a bit of a newbie to this chicken world.

    And thanks for the links, they were exactly what I was looking for!
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Breed is the shape of the chicken. Variety is the color of that breed. If you don't keep the colors separated, even if they are the same breed, you won't know what color the offspring will be.
    Some breeds only have one variety, some 2 or 3, some breeds come in many varieties.

    If you take a black Wyandotte and cross it with a partridge. The offspring will most likely be black with some red in the hackles. No longer either a black nor partridge and then it will take a long time to breed those color genes out of them.

    In order to raise gold laced Wyandotte chicks, both parents need to be GLW. If you have a mixed flock, you won't know which rooster bred which hen.

    Here's more food for thought on the subject.

    http://kippenjungle.nl/basisEN.htm
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013

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