Comb and Waddle

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jab2you, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. jab2you

    jab2you Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2013
    Anahuac Texas
    So, my LCO (Lemon Cuckoo Orpington) has some bumps that are black and grey on his comb and waddle. He is approximately five months old. Eating mash like crazy. Poo is soft not runny just jelloish :tongue . Oh also eating BOSS and red, romaine and iceberg lettuce. His disposition hasn't changed. Running around chasing the ladies, crowing and scratching. He (Tex) is my first feathered fowl friend and I'm very concerned. Please assist.[​IMG]

    Thank You All in advance for your help.
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Jul 24, 2013
    That looks like dry fowl pox to me. Fowl Pox is a viral disease of poultry that is spread by mosquitoes, flies, and other biting/flying insects. In its dry form (most common form), it appears as bumps or scabs on a bird's comb, face, and wattles. These bumps may become large enough in size and quantity to obstruct the bird's vision, but in most cases cause no problems. In its wet form, Fowl Pox appears as bumps or lesions in the bird's mouth and respiratory tract, sometimes leading to suffocation. Both forms of Fowl Pox typically run their course in 3-6 weeks, spreading through the entire flock. Other than making sure the birds can see well enough to eat and drink, the only treatment you can give is antibiotics to prevent secondary infection.

    If not Fowl Pox, then I would suspect pecking/scratching injuries. Chickens get them all the time; they are usually not serious and will scab off within a few days to a week.

    In either case, as long as Tex continues to act normal, he should be fine. He's a very handsome rooster. [​IMG]
     
  3. jab2you

    jab2you Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2013
    Anahuac Texas
    BantamLover21 Thanks for giving me the info.
     

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