commercial hens

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by chick_magnet, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. chick_magnet

    chick_magnet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2010
    A friend of mine gave me some hen that he raise commercially for eggs production. He couldn't remember the breed when i asked him but they are all white with big comb and lay large brown eggs. At first i thought it was white leg horn but heard they lay white eggs. their butt was pink but thats because they laid so much egg. I don't give them any calcium so some of the feathers are slowly growing back. Any ideas of what breed are these hens?
     
  2. The Chickinn

    The Chickinn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 28, 2008
    near SF, CA
    They could be White Plymouth Rocks. White Plymouth Rocks are good brown egg layers, are totally white feathered, and have single combs.
     
  3. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Jul 22, 2009
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    Hmmm it sounds like White leghorns that you are discribing but they white eggs and Red Sexlinks are the main ones that a raised for commercial brown egg production. Do you have any pics of your hens. ? Are they really large hens like the ones they use as breeders to produce eggs to hatch broiler chicks from to butcher ? If so then they are cornish rock hybrids. Pics would help
     
  4. The Chickinn

    The Chickinn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cornish rock hybrids are not used for laying though, RAREROO, they are used for meat. Only some of the hybrids get hed back for breeding. And all of the companies that own the Cornish Rock name are from South America and/or Africa. Just so you know.
     
  5. chick_magnet

    chick_magnet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2010
    Quote:chickin sounds like he/she is on the money. the comb is large at first i thought she was a rooster. and yeah these are definitely commercial birds. they have short and fat legs. when i first got them they couldn't walk really far. they had to sit down and eat but now the walk alot more. and they were like 12lbs when i first raised them they lost a lot of weight thought they about 8lbs now i think. and they are only 10 months old according to my friends.
     
  6. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Well Cornish Rocks may not have been the appropriate name, but the hybirds used for producing eggs that are send to be incubated and hatched as broiler chicks to be butchered are the ones I am talking about. My family and I have both worked in the large houses with the huge hybrid birds that sound much like what chick_magnet described in the last post. They are used for producing eggs that will hatch to become meat birds, not for the eating egg market like leghorns. These are kept in the long breeder houses with a row of nest boxes in the middle and the eggs are brought in on a conveyor belt and collected by the workers. And like chick_magnet, these are huge birds with the hens reach 12 poulds easily and they have short stumpy leggs and cant walk far and its more of a duck waddle when they do walk lol . And the roosters in there are nearly the size of turkeys and you can barely pic them up. And yes, the hens sometimes get combs as large and what normal backyard roosters get. and at the end of the year, when their egg production starts to drop, they are all shipped off to the butcher plants to be grinded up in processed foods becuase at this age they are too tough to be used as regluar young meat birds are. And when they go out, there are always a few escapees and the owner of the house told us if we can catch them we can have them so we load them up and turn them loose in the yard for a while and like chick_magnet said, they will drop a few pounds when they come off of that commercial feed but the look healthier when they lose a few pounds and regrow there feathers that were lost from the crowded conditions in the breeder houses. We usually end up eating most of them but we may save a few of the nicer looking hens to hatch some chicks from.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2010

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