Composting with Worms

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by drewskimac, Mar 13, 2017.

  1. drewskimac

    drewskimac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm wanting to start composting with worms, I know that red wigglers are said to be the best; so its generally recommended that I order a couple pounds of them online.However, I don't see why I cant collect worms that are naturally living in my garden and use them? I know they wont work as well, but my question is will they work? I'd love to hear different opinions and especially personal experiences.

    Thanks!
     
  2. eggbert420

    eggbert420 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    My son collect worms from my yard and put them in my compost pile. They will eat table scaps in no time . We also throw rabbit poop in it.
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Are you planning a vermicompost bin in your house? Or are you wanting to encourage worms in your compost pile outside? There is a huge difference. collecting worms from outside might work, if you be sure to collect just the red wigglers. However, there are quite a few different species, even among the red wigglers. Also, sometimes, if you collect from outside, they simply refuse to stay in your bin, and you'll find that they have all done a massive crawl off, and find dried worms all over your floor! I had that happen once, even with just the red ones that were collected from outside. However, the next time I tried it, I put some cardboard in my garden, and found it loaded with RW. I collected those, and populated my bin, and they moved in and have stayed happy ever since. The easiest and cheapest way to get started is to get a few worms from someone who has an established bin. (Perhaps ask on your state thread?) Some stores sell them as fish bait. A pound is a LOT of worms! A bin can easily be started with a small handful!
     
  4. eggbert420

    eggbert420 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    They will stay there as long as there is somthing for them to eat.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Nope. Not always so, with wild harvested worms. I speak with experience on a crawl off from a very well appointed bin.
     
  6. eggbert420

    eggbert420 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    We keep ours in two square wooden compost bins connected by pvc pipes. When we want to harvest the soil we stop feeding in the one they are in. They migrate to the other for the food we put in it. Its very simple, we also feed them to our chickens. My son also go's fishing with them.
     
  7. drewskimac

    drewskimac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for your replies! Will see if I can find some red wigglers in the yard. (probably wont, as they are mostly earthworms...) If so, i'll end up buying some at the bait shop. Not really interested in putting in like 30$ for a huge amount and shipping right now haha.
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    try laying some cardboard down in an unused corner of your yard, in your compost heap, or garden. RW love cardboard. Then, you'll just have to pick them up from that one area, or simply transfer them with the cardboard into your bin. (but I think I'd pick them up individually, just so I didn't transfer some undesirable insects or slugs to the bin!
     
  9. drewskimac

    drewskimac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've tried this before and usually just find the common earthworm. These don't really compost well, right?
     
  10. mich9510

    mich9510 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's my understanding the the reason the red wigglers are best for indoor composting is because they migrate up. I have a small worm farm that I made out of 5 gallon buckets.
    The bottom one is just a regular bucket that catches the worm tea and some castings. The second bucket sits inside the first one And has holes drilled in it so the castings and tea can drain into the bottom bucket. I laid down a layer of compost, put the worms in it and then lots of newspaper ( shredded), coffee grounds, etc. On top of that bucket, I have another bucket with holes drilled in it. This is also filled with compost but sits directly on top of the second bucket. As the worms run out of food, they will migrate up into the top bucket through the holes I drilled. When I start seeing worms in the top bucket, I know the second bucket is full of vermicomposted material and the worms have done their job. I empty it into my garden and fill it up with more scraps. I sit it on the other buckets and so on and so forth. Other worms such as nightcrawlers migrate down when the food gets low. This would cause them to drown in the bottom bucket.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017

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