Compound 1080

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by TransplantedTexan, Jan 23, 2008.

  1. TransplantedTexan

    TransplantedTexan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bear Creek, Wi
  2. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    Interesting stuff (naturally occurring antiruminant! - Gotta run down all plants that produce this and find out what will grow in our zone - deer suppression).

    Looks like the bill is currently being gnawed on in committee:

    http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d110:h.r.04775:
     
  3. FourIsWaltz

    FourIsWaltz Out Of The Brooder

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    1080 works really well. So well that it has secondary toxicity problems. Critters that eat the critters you poison can die too. (That's the reason I've heard for the ban.) It's also easy to mis-handle through carelessness or accident, poisoning the user or someone else through something they contaminate.

    It's effective, but probably not worth the trouble.
     
  4. TransplantedTexan

    TransplantedTexan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Definately not worth the trouble.
    I wasn't posting to see if it was good to use.
    It seems really careless, I think it should be banned.
     
  5. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Don't want to give the wrong impression, myself (there are far better poisons). However, I'm a big fan of toxic plants (all `wimpy' ornamentals are scarfed up by deer here). When I wikied the 1080 I ran into some potentially useful plants...

    "Sodium fluoroacetate occurs naturally in at least 40 plants in Australia, Brazil and Africa. It was first identified as the poison of poison leaf Dichapentalum cymosum by Marais in 1944,[3][4] although it had been reported as early as 1904 that colonists in Sierra Leone used extracts of Chailletia toxicaria which also contains fluoroacetic acid or its salts to poison rats.[5][6] It is believed that the compound is even present in tea leaves in tiny amounts.[7] The Australian pea family Gastrolobium (“poison peas”), have sodium fluoroacetate in the leaf tips and seeds. This forces livestock farmers in Western Australia to hand-weed out all the plants from their paddocks. It also means that some Western Australian herbivores have, by natural selection, developed partial immunity to the effects of fluoroacetate; this has been used for an advantage in DEC’s wildlife conservation project named Western Shield."

    So, thanks for posting TT!

    Add some more inedible flora to the already existing mix of Castor Beans, Wisterias, Daturas, etc.
     

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