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Concerned about Red Star size!!!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by operator16, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. operator16

    operator16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2010
    Colorado
    I have two Red Stars/Cin. Queens and they are almost 19 weeks. They are about 15 inches tall. They have a huge yard, lots of space to run all day, access to lots of garden and yard greens, bugs, etc.. They like some scratch in the morning and will nibble on the flock raiser feed. They seem very content and healthy.

    My friend has 3 from the same bin at the feed store. Hers live in her house with her. They are HUGE. They are about 24 inches tall and huge and heavy. She says she's going through a 50 pound bag of feed every two weeks and pounds of vegies. Hers are on layer feed already.

    Could there be a difference in the birds because of where they live and what food is available? I'm kind of concerned. I didn't move mine from the Purina Start and Grow until just a few weeks ago. And, like I said they just nibble on the food. I haven't refilled the food bin in a week or so because my birds just barely touch it.

    Are my birds ok? How big would you say a Red Star/Cin. Queen would be at this point?

    How big are birds before they can lay an egg?
     
  2. CoyoteMagic

    CoyoteMagic RIP ?-2014

    Red Sexies aren't usually real big birds. Mine were much smaller than my Black Sexies. Flock Raiser is the only thing I feed my birds. My reds started at 16weeks my Blacks at 20. Your birds are fine. What was your friend feeding her chicks before layer?
     
  3. carrlr

    carrlr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2010
    Southern Illinois
    Quote:Wow, 50 lbs that's more than my 13 birds eat in a month. Mine get friuts and vegetables and some free ranging too. Assuming your birds aren't laying yet? I know of many folks who don't start on layer feed until their chickens actually start to lay. I'm not sure I'd keep food for so long if they haven't eaten it in a week. Does it look ok, with no mold or anything? Do you pick your birds up? If so, can you feel their breastbone or do they have "meat" on them. I would just check their food and as long as you notice they're eating when they free range i don't think you have any worries.
     
  4. operator16

    operator16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2010
    Colorado
    Start and Grow - Purina. Does it sound right? I told her I carry my birds around under by arm like a loaf of bread. She said hers haven't fit under her arm in a long time...


    Quote:
     
  5. operator16

    operator16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2010
    Colorado
    Mine eat all day long. They've devoured my garden...(my own fault). I give them fresh veggies from the kitchen on most days too. I also hand out some meal worms every other day or so. They do like the food. I see them eat it. But, they run straight out to my squash plants and demolish my tomatoes and grapes like it's their buffet. They all feel just right to me. I don't feel bones sticking out. They've got great energy. Very chatty and social. Their feathers are full and shiny! Hers aren't laying and neither are mine. I wonder if it's an exercise thing? Mine run all day from one end of the yard to the next. Hers do have a small area to hang out in. I wonder if hers have fattened up with more food and less space. Could that happen?




    Quote:Wow, 50 lbs that's more than my 13 birds eat in a month. Mine get friuts and vegetables and some free ranging too. Assuming your birds aren't laying yet? I know of many folks who don't start on layer feed until their chickens actually start to lay. I'm not sure I'd keep food for so long if they haven't eaten it in a week. Does it look ok, with no mold or anything? Do you pick your birds up? If so, can you feel their breastbone or do they have "meat" on them. I would just check their food and as long as you notice they're eating when they free range i don't think you have any worries.
     
  6. SpringChickens

    SpringChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 1, 2009
    College Station, Tx
    That wouldn't surprise me at all. I really think that exercise has a lot to do with size (and sexual maturity!). There have been hundreds of animal studies showing a direct correlation between percent body fat and age at puberty. I am still shocked that 3 birds go through a 50 pound bag of feed in two weeks! I have 20 birds, and it takes them over 2 months to go through a 50 lb. bag (they also free range most of the time).
     
  7. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    May 14, 2008
    North Phoenix
    My Coop
    My Cinnamon Queens were big eaters, big girls and laid big brown eggs.

    You may want to check their poop to see if they should be wormed.
     
  8. operator16

    operator16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2010
    Colorado
    Ok. I need a little more assistance! I've checked all my birds this morning and I can clearly feel almost all of their breastbones jutting out beyond their breasts. They feel very bony. In fact on all but 2 or 3 I don't feel much breast meat at all. I checked all the fresh poop I could find this morning and I don't see anything that resembles worms. I've compared the poop to the poop chart that's floating around here online. Everything looks good. I wish I could weigh them. But, if you had to guess how big your EEs were at 20 weeks, what would you guess? My Red Stars/Cin Q. are 18 weeks. My Polish are about 26 weeks and are smaller than my 18 week old Red STars. Any other ideas? They all eat all day long picking the whole garden apart, devouring the little scratch I put down in the am, pecking away at a flock block, fresh vegies daily from the kitchen, bugs, meal worm treats, etc.... AAAggghhhrrrr![​IMG]
     
  9. carrlr

    carrlr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2010
    Southern Illinois
    Ok, maybe mine are just a little "fatter" than yours, but I don't feel "breatbones jutting out beyond their breasts". It would NOT assume they have worms, just by that, however have you considered using apple cider vinegar (ACV). You can use it at a rate of a tablespoon per gallon of water. Just DON'T use it in metal waterers. The link below provides some of the benefits in addition to being a natural de-wormer. I still don't think you have any worries as you girls seem healthy and are active. You can buy ACV at the grocery store, but I would recommend you get a higher quality from a health store like GNC.


    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=41321&p=1
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2010
  10. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Jun 1, 2009
    Ohio
    There can be a lot of reasons why your birds are light weight.
    If I was you I would consider hitting them with a good wormer. I use Ivermectin it can be used for treatment of most all types of worms in your fowl, and can be used to help keep external parasites, like Red Mites, down too. After worming them give them some Plain Yogurt with Live and Active Culture in it and if it has a sweetener it should be sugar and not corn syrup... After about a week or so you can start giving Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) to them.

    Here is how to use the Ivermectin -
    You will need a syringe to get ivomec out of the bottle, and you can use it to apply the dosage listed below by holding the birds mouth open, and dripping it into the back of its throat. Another method is to apply the correct dosage to a piece of bread, then feed it to the bird you are treating.


    * 5 to 7 drops orally for adult size birds.
    * 3 to 5 drops orally for bantam size birds.


    It is recommended to worm your fowl on a regular basis, and this method will need to be repeated every 2 to 3 months to keep worms under control. In severe cases, you may want to retreat the bird 10 days after the initial treatment, to make sure you take care of the problem.

    Ivomec can be purchased at most farm supply stores in the cattle section.

    Here is some information on ACV -
    You can use any Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar with mother.
    Bragg
    Spectrum Organic
    Omega Nutrition
    Dynamic Health
    There are other brands out there also just remember you will want Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar mother.

    Apple Cider vinegar is rich in the vitamins, minerals and trace elements found in apples, especially potassium. It will normalize pH levels in the stomach, improve digestion and the assimilation of nutrients.
    A few more benefits of Oral Apple Cider Vinegar are:
    *Reduces intestinal and fecal odors.
    *Aids in digestion.
    *Helps to break down minerals and fats.
    *Assists the animal to assimilate proteins.
    *Assists the animal to convert food better.
    *It lowers the pH of the digestive tract which
    will make an environment less welcoming
    to pathogens therefore will reduce common
    infections and increases resistance to disease.
    *Improves stamina and fertility.
    *It is a great overall tonic that will improve the general well being of the animal.
    If started while Birds are young (1-1/2 to 2weeks), birds
    *Will feather out quicker.
    *Are hardier.
    *Grow to their potential sooner when used with an adequate feed.
    I find the meat is also leaner due to the fats being converted quicker.

    Cautions:
    Do not use metal water dishes (except stainless steal).
    Vinegar should not be used internally with animals that have an irritated lining of the intestinal tract.
    Add 1/8-1/4 of a teaspoon of Apple Cider Vinegar to every 4 fl ozs of water, or 1/8-1/4 cup per gallon of water.

    Also I would not use at the same time with a commercial wormer. On some commercial wormer it will have one funky chemical reaction with ACV...
    Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place. Unopened, it will keep indefinitely; once opened it will keep about 6 months.

    Yogurt is a good source of animal protein (Poultry digest animal protein easier than plant protein)
    Yogurt also a good source calcium, iodine, vitamin B2 and vitamin B12.
    Benefits include -
    Boosting the immune system and helping weight management.

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2010

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