Concerned - found blood in poop

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dmdhart, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This morning while checking for eggs I noticed what appeared to be blood in some poop. I have no way of knowing which chicken it was. In that pen I have over 15 chickens! Is there something that I could treat all the chickens with?
     
  2. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What ages are your chickens? Are any of them new to you? Is anyone hunched in the corner looking cold?

    Also, sometimes normal shedding of intestinal lining is mistaken as unhealthy bloody poop. Can you describe or share a picture of the bloody poop you saw?
     
  3. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No new chickens, and no one appears sick. There are various ages, from a few months (they were hatched out here) to a few years old. Not sure how to describe it, looked like new blood. My camera is on the blink so can't take a picture.
     
  4. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Coccidiosis is usually revealed in poop that looks like abused hamburger meat - or in actual small pools of blood in the stool. Usually if it's cocci, more than one is affected at the same time. Also, cocci infestation will usually manifest fairly early in life - or not too long after they start having access to fresh ground.

    Other possibilities are that someone swallowed a nail or a staple or something that caused intestinal distress.

    If you do think you have coccidiosis, you can medicate everyone with Corid, but it is recommended that you not eat the eggs for two weeks after treatment.

    I have more information if you want to do some real serious reading.
     
  5. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What is Corid?
     
  6. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, I mix in medicated chick starter with their food, doesn't that fight off coccidosis?
     
  7. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you're mixing medicated feed in with regular the dose won't be strong enough, but will be coming thru into the eggs--basicaly it's not a good idea. Corid is amprolium and is used for treating cocci. You can also use Sulmet, but I like Corid better. Here is a link to a "poop page" that will hopefully help you determine if you have cocci or not. If you do have cocci I'd suspect your younger chickens would be the ones to keep the closest eye on though I have had older molting hens affected. Also, if it is cocci you'll need to treat the whole flock even though some might not be symptomatic.

    http://happyhenhouse.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=poop&action=display&thread=7588
     
  8. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Corid is a brand name of liquid Amprolium 9.6%. It is usually labeled for pigs or cattle, but it's the same stuff you need for your chickens.

    You medicated chick starter contains a small amount of Amprolium in it which is supposed to help them fight off infestation of cocci organisms, but it does not prevent. Actually, i think i am going to stop using it because with two flocks, i have used the medicated starter, and i have had to medicate for infestation both times.

    The trick with coccidiosis is that it usually shows up in younger chickens and rarely in older chickens. However, delay of treatment (if it IS cocci) gives it longer to advance.

    The good news is that once they have survived an infestation to a particular strain of cocci, they should be resistant to it for their lifetime - kind of like immunity.

    Both of my flocks displayed signs of infestation almost exactly 2 weeks after gaining full, daily access to the out doors. These symptoms in older chickens who have been outdoors for a long period of time is more rare.

    If i were you, i think that i would probably (i'm tentative to make this recommendation) wait another day and look for more bloody poop (or other symptoms) in the morning. If no more symptoms or bloody poop, and no lethargic chicks, i think i would just watch them and assume it was something else. If you do see anyone looking lethargic or more bloody poop - normally obvious on the roost - i would medicate with Corid immediately for 5 solid days in their water.

    Also, in my opinion, it is a good idea to have Corid on hand, especially if you ever intend to have young chicks again. This way you can always medicate immediately when you notice symptoms.
     
  9. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you, everyone for all of your advice. Tomorrow I'll head to tractor supply and pick up some Corid, (just in case) and I'll also stop using the medicated feed. I'll do what you suggested too, about looking at their poop tomorrow and the next day. I've put in on my schedule to clean out the coop tomorrow, so after I do that, it will be easier to do. All of my chickens have an extremely large area to run in. One flock has half an acre, the others are in a pen that is L shaped, one side about 100 feet long and 20 feet wide, the other leg of the L is about 20 feel wide by 125 - 150 feet long. Both have pretty decent size coops (one for is 10 feet wide by 16 feet long) the other coop is smaller, 12 feet by 8 feet.

    I am so glad that I found this site. I tell all of my chicken friends about it. You've always been a God send! Thank you for being there!
     
  10. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Happy to help. Let us know how it goes!
     

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