Concerned one of my hens has Infectious Coryza - Advice?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Redtopranch, Nov 18, 2008.

  1. Redtopranch

    Redtopranch Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 18, 2008
    Hi, I am new to Backyardchickens website and also to raising my little flock. I have had my girls now for only about 23 weeks. I recently (3 weeks ago) bought 10 new pullets and one rooster from an individual. These hens are about the same age as the girls. I introduced them to my flock where they share a coop and free range during the day. Today, I went to feed and check on all of them and found one of my original Red Star hens with watery eyes, runny nose (thick), and swollen eyes and face. I have read that we can treate with antibiotics, but wanted to get your advice and thoughts. I have read that this is highly contagious. I have 15 Buff Orpingtons chicks that are 4 weeks old and was also concerned about them.

    Thank you in advance. Paul at RedTopRanch - Huntsville, TX
     
  2. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    Sep 10, 2008
    Lakeland, FL
    You need to seperate her immediately and start her on antibiotics. Even if it's a virus the antibiotics will help with secondary infections. You should always quarantine new birds for at least 30 days before introducing them to your flock (I don't know if you did this or not, but just wanted to let you know).
     
  3. herechickchick

    herechickchick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    Memphis TN
    I would call your Agriculture extension and ask if you can have her tested for Coryza (just for you own piece of mind). If she has it I would destroy her and have a few random birds tested. If they are negative that is good, if not I would seriously consider eliminating the entire flock. Coryza spreads and never goes away, even if they do not look sick. Quarantine is so important.

    Prevention is the only sound approach in controlling infectious coryza. It usually can be prevented by management programs that eliminate contact between susceptible and infected birds. It requires only separating affected or carrier birds from the susceptible population. In order to prevent the infection, introduce started or adult birds only from sources known to be free of the infection. If infection occurs, complete depopulation followed by thorough cleaning/disinfecting is the only means for eliminating the disease.
     
  4. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    Adam hit the nail on the head there. I went to MSU and they ahve THE best Poultry science department ever. I called them when I suspected IC and ended up culling 150 birds due to it. It's not nice and it never goes away.
     
  5. Redtopranch

    Redtopranch Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 18, 2008
    Thank you for the great advice. I'm afraid I did not know about the "keeping the new ones seperated for 30 days". I did seperate the sick one as soon as I found her. I have started her on antibiotics this morning (just found her yesterday). I will call our Ag Extension Agent for further advice and testing. Thank you again.
     
  6. herechickchick

    herechickchick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    Memphis TN
    Quote:That is good that you separated her. It would probably be best to separate the old from the new until you here from the Ag. extension.

    Good Luck
     
  7. Redtopranch

    Redtopranch Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 18, 2008
    I spoke with a professor from Texas A&M. He said that it sounded like CRD (Mycoplasmosis) to him, because my hen does not have a "smelly" nasal discharge. I understood him to say this was worse than IC. I'm so disappointed that I ever tried to build up my flock with these new birds. He said that I might bring it under control only to have it flair up weeks - months later.

    A good piece of advice he offered is that we need to "treat the world like it is dirty".

    I'll start doing my research now to figure out what to do. I welcome your thoughts.
     
  8. Andora

    Andora Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 26, 2008
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Does your local university do livestock necropsy? If so, I would take the sick bird there and have her completely examined. That way you will know for certain what you are fighting. (I don't know about your area, but here it only costs $10!)

    I made the same mistake of buying birds from a local farm, then later finding they had diseases. I'm so sorry you're going through this. [​IMG]
     

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