Concerning poo!!??...Yellowish, Foamy Poop

hwrights04

Chirping
Jun 17, 2016
55
22
76
East Texas
We have 4 hens that just turned 4 years old. 2 are Rhode Island Reds and the other 2 are Easter Eggers. Recently, we noticed that one of the Easter Eggers was having some foamy, yellowish poop. We have seen it several times over the last week or so. She is acting fine, eating and drinking normally, but she hasn’t been laying, and she’s lost a few feathers. Not sure if she’s beginning to molt or what, which could explain the laying issue. All other hens are doing just fine.
I’ve done some research online, which seems to point to either intestinal parasites or a bacterial infection. Is there a way to tell for sure or treatments that we could try that wouldn’t hurt, or do we really need to find a vet that can do a test on the stool to make sure we administer appropriate treatment?
Here is a photo:
F6D10F18-5AE8-43B3-8886-A3FD8124C14F.jpeg
Thank you in advance for any advice!
 

RumneyRoost

Songster
Jul 24, 2018
283
420
131
Ontario
The first thing I would do is check her (and the other birds) over for lice/mites. Check under the wings and around the vent. They might be easier to see at night with a flashlight.

The next thing I would do is to make sure her crop is emptying. Check at night when she goes to roost that it's full. First thing in the morning before she eats or drinks check to see that it has emptied.

How is her weight? Is her keel bone more prominent than the others?

As far as worming there are a few different options. Ideally you would get a fecal done first so you know what you need to target. I don't live in the US so I'm not sure which brands of dewormer are available to you.

A bacterial infection is certainly possible. Hens can develop things like salpingitis. Unfortunately many reproductive issues are difficult to treat. Reproductive cancers are also common in chickens :(
 

hwrights04

Chirping
Jun 17, 2016
55
22
76
East Texas
The first thing I would do is check her (and the other birds) over for lice/mites. Check under the wings and around the vent. They might be easier to see at night with a flashlight.

The next thing I would do is to make sure her crop is emptying. Check at night when she goes to roost that it's full. First thing in the morning before she eats or drinks check to see that it has emptied.

How is her weight? Is her keel bone more prominent than the others?

As far as worming there are a few different options. Ideally you would get a fecal done first so you know what you need to target. I don't live in the US so I'm not sure which brands of dewormer are available to you.

A bacterial infection is certainly possible. Hens can develop things like salpingitis. Unfortunately many reproductive issues are difficult to treat. Reproductive cancers are also common in chickens :(

Oh dear! :( I’m hoping it’s nothing serious. We love this hen so much- she’s a favorite!
Any idea if it has to be an avian vet to do a fecal test or can regular vets do them as well?
 

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