Condensation from increased ventilation?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Time-Out, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We recently cut down some trees behind the building used as a coop. The next day, there was loads of condensation on the ceiling.

    I tried making the vents bigger, but it's still getting really wet, whereas it was dryer before, with less ventilation. I'm at a bit of a loss.

    There is currently loads of ventilation, the building is huge and isn't even fully stocked, so I don't understand how the condensation is forming.

    It's 12' x 24', about 7.5' tall and there are 40 chickens in it (18 LF and 22 small bantams). I can measure exactly how much ventilation there is, but it'll take a while. It goes all the way round under the roof. There are also gaps in the doors and one of the walls.

    I really regret cutting that hedge back down to a hedge height rather than leaving it as trees :-(
     
  2. Red Barn Farms

    Red Barn Farms ~Friendly Fowl~

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    I think given a few days everything will settle back down temperature wise. Once the hedges were cut down did it allow more sunlight to hit the roof than before and changes in air circulation? I'd think for some reason there was a drastic change in temperature and things will be back to normal given some time.
     
  3. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, there is more sunlight on that side now late afternoon/early evening time. That side faces west. There is also more ventilation through the gaps as the 'hedge' was in the way before.

    How long do you think it will take to settle? The water is dripping off the ceiling every morning and making the bedding wet. It stinks of ammonia in places :-(
     
  4. Red Barn Farms

    Red Barn Farms ~Friendly Fowl~

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    I'm not certain but if possible maybe adding a heat source inside will help speed up the process. If water is dripping I'm not sure electric heat would be a good idea either.
     
  5. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You mean more chickens? lol
     
  6. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    soffit vents arent nearly enough. Do you have windows in it for true ventilation? Gaps in doors dont truly count as ventilation either.
     
  7. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know what soffit vents are? I haven't bought or fastened any vents anywhere; I just call 'vents' gaps that ventilate the coop.

    I do have windows, but they're for letting daylight in. If I were to uncover them, snow would blow in.

    Just to give you an idea, I'd guess there's about 12sqft of ventilation along the front wall (6" x 24' between the wall and the roof). Just been looking for some pics, but they all seem really old. I snap some updated one tomorrow, then we can all see what the ventilation is like. Although the question was why is there condensation now the trees are down.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: That's just the right amount.............for 12 chickens.
    You need a LOT more venting
     
  9. Barred Rock Caf

    Barred Rock Caf Out Of The Brooder

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    The dripping water may be the result of ice damming occurring from the sunlight now striking the roof and increasing the snow melt. At night, the water refreezes and creeps under the shingles (I'm betting the roof has a low pitch to it) where it then thaws once again during the day and drips into the building inside. This is bad news all the way around and yes, soffit venting is the answer. The roof deck should NEVER be wet-ever. Something drastic has been activated through change. Soffit venting is where you vent right at the point where a wall meets the roof truss or plain old common rafter. Air circulation, NOT HEAT, is the ticket for reversing this situation.

    Barred Rock Cafe [​IMG]
     
  10. ll

    ll Chillin' With My Peeps

    Open the windows - the snow isn't blowing every day.

    Make a triangle awning over the windows if you can, but even if you can't ~
    just keep them open. Go. Now. Open them.
    [​IMG]
     

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