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condensation on eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by RonnieAtkeson, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. RonnieAtkeson

    RonnieAtkeson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2008
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    Bator is running at 100.6 and humidity is 52%. The eggs look sweaty, is that normal? This is a Genesis 1588 with egg turner if that matters. This is my first time trying, got 9 eggs in there and im biting my nails already.
     
  2. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    I don't think they are supposed to be like that. What day are you on? If you just set them, it's probably because they weren't warm enough before going into the bator. You should probably try and get your humidity down a bit.
     
  3. RonnieAtkeson

    RonnieAtkeson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2008
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    I set them some hours ago, they sat in the house for hours before going into the bator. how low should i go.
     
  4. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    You should probably not have it higher than about 45% for the incubation, then up to 55%+ for the hatch. If you just set them then they were still pretty cold inside the egg, and that's what caused the condensation.
     
  5. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    Quote:I agree. Condensation or sweaty eggs is not good. Try to get your humidity down.
     
  6. batorcrazzy

    batorcrazzy Out Of The Brooder

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    etting Ready to Hatch Eggs
    Step1
    Order fertilized eggs from a hatchery or from poultry farmers. The eggs should be medium sized and free from holes or cracks. If you are breeding chickens, the best way for the eggs to hatch is to allow the hens to sit on them. This is called setting.
    Step2
    Choose an incubator. A forced-air incubator is large, great for large numbers of eggs and has a fan. A still-air incubator is smaller, hatches a fewer number of eggs and does not have a fan. Most experts prefer a forced-air incubator. Speak to a veterinarian or a poultry farmer to find out which incubator is best to for your needs.
    Step3
    Test the incubator before putting eggs into it for about twenty-four hours to make sure the temperature and humidity stays consistent within the incubator. The incubator should be placed indoors and the room should have proper ventilation and the ability for moving air.
    The Eggs and the Incubator
    Step1
    Place the eggs into an incubator. The temperature will naturally go down in the incubator for the first few hours. Do not adjust the temperature for the first 48 hours after setting the eggs. The incubation period is about 21 days.
    Step2
    Keep the temperature steady at about 100 degrees Fahrenheit in a forced-air incubator. In a still-air incubator, the temperature should be kept at about 102 degrees Fahrenheit.
    Step3
    Set the humidity at 58 to 60% and then increase it to 65% when the eggs start hatching.
    Step4
    Turn the eggs about half a turn four to six times a day. However, do not turn the eggs within three days of hatching. Never set eggs with the small ends pointing upward. All the eggs should hatch within about twenty-four hours.
    Step5
    Do not help any of the chicks out of the shells once the eggs start hatching. Chicks need to work their own way out of the egg for proper maturity.
    Step6
    Clean the incubator after the eggs have hatched and before reusing the incubator
     
  7. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Humidity in the incubator varies with the different makes and models of the incubator. Read
    your manual for the specific setup for your incubator. Most incubators recommend 50-55% between setting the eggs and 3 days prior to hatching. Then you would increase
    to 65% during the hatching process.

    I got this right off of this site. It's how I'm doing it.

    I hope I am correct.
     
  8. RonnieAtkeson

    RonnieAtkeson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2008
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    The condensation is over, thanks all for the replys. The bator was running at 100.6 and 40% when i got home. I did raise it a bit and if it dont happen again ill leave it around 50-55%. The little 4 page manual it came with has nothing about humidity %'s in it. Thanks all for the help, it realy is nice of you and appreciated.
     

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