Confounded by Sicilian buttercup chicks shunning their heat cave

Allsfairinloveandbugs

Crowing
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Feb 10, 2020
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Now I want some of those too:D
Me, too!

:he No, no, no. Must have self-control. No chicken math, no chicken math. . .
I had the thought earlier in this thread that before long, Privett hatchery will wonder why they are becoming swamped with Buttercup orders. It's. Happening. :lau
 

tripletfeb

💪🏋️You are stronger than your excuses🏋️💪
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Jun 9, 2018
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The little farm, northern Ohio
View attachment 2917268 View attachment 2917269 An update in honor of the Buttercups. Scotty on the left (the more mature of the two, and Saffron on the right, the one that tends to get into trouble, are turning eleven weeks old.

For some reason, they were intent on exploring the favorite nest boxes this morning while I cleaned the coop. They appeared to be fascinated by the pine shavings and were scratching around in them. Wood shavings are a New Thing to the Buttercups because they are only in the nesting boxes. Sand is in the coops and runs as the substrate they've been used to their entire lives.

They are generally accepted by the entire flock. Only one hen, eight-month old Elsie, a Blue Plymouth Rock, insists on chasing and terrorizing them. But hey, that's what pullets are for, amirite?
They are gorgeous! Are they considered a heritage breed?
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
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Wow! They are gorgeous! I've never seen this breed before and I love their unique combs and their feather patterns!
They're super decorative. My hubby thought they were the cutest things and that's why he had to have one (it was the only breed he kept asking for, even if he couldn't remember the name). Me, I like the tiny "crown" on their heads (it'll be more pronounced once they mature) but given how wackadoo mine is, I doubt I'll get another one. Unless hubby asks again lol.
 

azygous

Enabler
12 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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The Buttercups are turning fourteen weeks. Amazingly, they still fit through their pop holes in their brooding pen. They still take advantage of the safety there, but they spend most of their time pretending to be grownups.

Last night at "bed check", the Buttercups were missing from their coop. It wasn't "omigod where are they?" but "what are they up to now?"

They had elected to partake in roosting mayhem in the main coop. One was perched on the low perch where the elderly and the meek roost. The other was running an obstacle course of hens on the floor who were frantically watching for an opening on the long perch.

It didn't take long for both to decide the excitement of pretending to be grownups was overblown and emotionally draining, and they returned to their own coop. But they were still full of the adventurous spirit and ended up in the top tier of the stacked nest boxes in that coop. Kind of reminded me of sixth grade when the regular teacher stepped out of the classroom, leaving a novice substitute in charge. It was a signal for everyone to indulge in anarchy - good times.

So, I fished the two miscreants out of the nest box and stuck them on their perch, and turned the lights out.
 

BigBlueHen53

Love one another ❤️
Mar 5, 2019
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The Buttercups are turning fourteen weeks. Amazingly, they still fit through their pop holes in their brooding pen. They still take advantage of the safety there, but they spend most of their time pretending to be grownups.

Last night at "bed check", the Buttercups were missing from their coop. It wasn't "omigod where are they?" but "what are they up to now?"

They had elected to partake in roosting mayhem in the main coop. One was perched on the low perch where the elderly and the meek roost. The other was running an obstacle course of hens on the floor who were frantically watching for an opening on the long perch.

It didn't take long for both to decide the excitement of pretending to be grownups was overblown and emotionally draining, and they returned to their own coop. But they were still full of the adventurous spirit and ended up in the top tier of the stacked nest boxes in that coop. Kind of reminded me of sixth grade when the regular teacher stepped out of the classroom, leaving a novice substitute in charge. It was a signal for everyone to indulge in anarchy - good times.

So, I fished the two miscreants out of the nest box and stuck them on their perch, and turned the lights out.
Miscreants indeed! In a couple more weeks these weisenheimers will lead an insurrection and be ruling the roost! 😆
 

SusanMc

Songster
Jul 28, 2020
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The night following bringing home two four-day old Buttercups, the power failed during the night and in the morning, these two babies seemed unfazed by their cold night which was in the mid 50s.

Ever since, the chicks being nearly two-weeks old now, they have refused the heating pad cave during the day. It's been in the 80s so it hasn't been surprising they needed no heat, but yesterday was very cool and last night was in the low 40s and cold enough I put on winter clothing this morning to feed and clean. What I discovered has me confounded.

Each night since I brought them home, the chicks refused to go into the heating pad cave and I've had to put them in as it got dark. This morning, there was no poop inside the cave, and a pile beside it where the chicks has obviously huddled all night. They seemed normal and healthy and active this morning, unlike what I would expect from chicks of this age who had been subjected to chill temps all night long.

I read that this breed is not cold tolerant, having originated in the Mediterranean. Are these two tiny polar bear cubs outliers or have others had similar experiences with this breed of chicks?
I would try turning down the heat a bit and possibly making the entrance bigger if at all possible
 

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