Confused about fertile eggs vs. non-fertile

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by OHMYCHICKIES, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. OHMYCHICKIES

    OHMYCHICKIES Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 28, 2008
    Since I found out I have a roo, I'm trying to prepare what to expect. All I wanted chickens were for laying eggs. Since we have a roo, what if they are fertile, do you still eat them? If there is blood what do you do? I'm new at this so any ideas would help. I don't really want little chicks to hatch yet.
     
  2. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    As long as you collect them every day, you should be fine. They won't develop unless conditions are right... high temps, humidity, etc. It's always possible to get an egg with a little blood or this or that, but just crack them into a separate bowl before using if you're worried about it, I wouldn't be though unless you actually run into one. Fertile eggs taste just as good and work just the same [​IMG]
     
  3. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    Jun 27, 2008
    West Central Ohio
    Yes you can eat fertile eggs. Fertile eggs are actually healthier to eat than non-fertile (so my mom says [​IMG] ) Also, this may sound disgusting, but it's considered a delecasy(sp?) in China (I think) to eat a cooked chick that's halfway developed in the egg.
     
  4. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
  5. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I went to school in China and traveled all over the country and Tibet. I've eaten a lot of "strange" meals (ate a bat once) there, but I've never heard of that. I don't doubt it, but never even heard of it.
     
  6. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    Yeah, there's a name for it..... Balut
     
  7. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 22, 2008
    Annetta Kentucky
    Quote:I went to school in China and traveled all over the country and Tibet. I've eaten a lot of "strange" meals (ate a bat once) there, but I've never heard of that. I don't doubt it, but never even heard of it.

    You mean "balut", you were right with the general region, butthe country was wrong.Its eaten in Nam and Cambodia. However there is a egg in the chinese cuisine called "thousand year old egg"here are links
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Century_egg (1000 year egg)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut balut
    dont ask why i know [​IMG]
     
  8. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

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    Jan 30, 2007
    WV
    There is no difference in taste from a fertile egg verses a non-fertile....Only way to have the right development in a fertile egg is with putting them under a broody hen or in an incubator to hatch out chicks...

    Bloodspots in eggs are called meatspots and can just be scooped out...its a glitch in the hens egg cycle that causes those...only reason you don't see them in store eggs is because they are been scanned and taken out before putting into cartons...
     
  9. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I went to school in China and traveled all over the country and Tibet. I've eaten a lot of "strange" meals (ate a bat once) there, but I've never heard of that. I don't doubt it, but never even heard of it.

    You mean "balut", you were right with the general region, butthe country was wrong.Its eaten in Nam and Cambodia. However there is a egg in the chinese cuisine called "thousand year old egg"here are links
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Century_egg (1000 year egg)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut balut
    dont ask why i know [​IMG]

    Arg, that "balut" sounds blahhhhh!
    I've eaten lots of "thousand year old eggs" though; actually, they're not bad. Truth be told, if it swims in the water of China, walks on four legs in China, or flies through the air of China, Anne and I have eaten it. The first time we were there was shortly after the Cultural Revolution, and it didn't take us long to learn not to ask what it was we were eating... meat's meat when you're hungry.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  10. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 22, 2008
    Annetta Kentucky
    Quote:You mean "balut", you were right with the general region, butthe country was wrong.Its eaten in Nam and Cambodia. However there is a egg in the chinese cuisine called "thousand year old egg"here are links
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Century_egg (1000 year egg)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut balut
    dont ask why i know [​IMG]

    Arg, that "balut" sounds blahhhhh!
    I've eaten lots of "thousand year old eggs" though; actually, they're not bad. Truth be told, if it swims in the water of China, walks on four legs in China, or flies through the air of China, Anne and I have eaten it. The first time we were there was shortly after the Cultural Revolution, and it didn't take us long to learn not to ask what it was we were eating... meat's meat when you're hungry.

    i learned the very same thing from my brother in laws mother in law. She is a pure bred redneck born in the Curry branch in Ky. Never ask whats in the stew, it might be possum or squirrel. I pretty much eat everything now except for dog, cat and the thing thats hanging on the northend of a southbound bull.
     

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