Confused roosters that think you are a hen.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Steamdemon, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. This has happened several times, and recently, Martin, one of the older roosters tried to chicken waltz around me. Has anyone else had this happen? It's funny when they do it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It may be the beginning of "human aggressive" behavior. It will cease to be funny if he starts flogging you. He may need an attitude adjustment.
     
  3. I've already been flogged, But I know when a rooster is about to flog me. Martin doesn't do it as much as Brutus, a big orange Warren rooster, who's also stubborn. However, it is nearing the time when roosters fight for dominance.
     
  4. PSJ

    PSJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2!!
     
  5. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    The "dance" really does mean two different things. If your roo hasn't flogged you yet, try reaching down and bringing him into a close hug when he dances up to you. Hold him very close with his head sort of tucked under your arm. Stroke his comb and wattles. Scratch the back of his neck. Run you hand down his back as you would a dog or cat. Do it for a few minutes until you feel his body relax.

    If he's got aggressive tendencies, this frequent handling will head it off by showing him you're in control. If he merely has a crush on you, then you're teaching him that he has nothing to fear from you and all is well and he's a good roo and you approve of him. If, however, he comes at you and tries to flog you, you will need to grab him and push him to the ground, hand on the back of his neck, keeping him pinned until he relaxes. Then do the hugging routine.

    I had to cope with a vicious biter soon after he got his hormones. He was very fearful and mistrustful of me. I did with him what I recommend you do with your roo, and now he's as gentle and trusting as a cocker spaniel. Not all roos are aggressive, and not all roos require rough treatment. In fact, I believe rough treatment only encourages more fear and mistrust.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013
  6. I might try that tomorrow. I've picked up a hen before, but not a rooster.
     
  7. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    People who have never cuddled a chicken, both hens and roosters, are really missing out. I would say that over half the chickens in any flock quickly get addicted to being hugged and cuddled, and yes, even kissed on their little heads.

    For chickens who have never been cuddled before, you want to kneel down on the ground at their level, slowly reach out, preferably with a treat in your hand, and gather them toward your knees, then wrap your arms around them. They will usually close their eyes in perfect contentment, relaxing, even melting into you.

    Those who are addicted to hugs, will jump into your lap if you sit on a stool, and will cuddle in your arms as long as you'll allow them to remain. There's nothing so sweet as having a chicken melt into your arms, close its eyes, and coo in contentment.

    I generally do "group hugs," more bang for the buck. I get down on my knees, and pretty quickly one hen will come in for a hug, then another, then another, even the rooster gets into the act, and I'll feel a soft pecking on my rear, and yet another hen wants to squeeze into the grand hug. My record is a six hen hug with one rooster in the middle.
     
  8. I've tried picking one of the smaller roosters up, but he's too fast for me...
     
  9. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    That's why you need to lure them in with a treat. Use something that requires them to stand still and nibble from your hand, like corn on the cob or even a raisin held tightly between finger and thumb. Then gradually stroke his back with your other hand while he's eating. After a few days of eating treats from your hand, he'll be willing to be picked up.

    Avoid sudden movements which tend to frighten and alarm. I keep a small carton of meal worms in m pocket for when I need to pick up a chicken. I simply hold the worm out, and when they come over to get it, I just pick them up. Then I give them the worm so they know there's a reward for being picked up.
     
  10. LaurieA

    LaurieA Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi everyone. I am new to chickens and accidentally ended up with my first rooster (that was supposed to be hen). He has been pretty cool so far, much more affectionate than my hen. He will let me pet him but the girl won't even let me touch her. They are 15 weeks old (approximately). Well anyway - today he was a little more affectionate then usual, really letting me give him a good petting, well then he started to do what I think might have been an attempt at the rooster waltz.

    I remember someone saying to put them in their place if they do that, so instinctively I just reached out and kinda poked him and he jumped back.

    Did I do the right thing?
     

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