Confused - Venilation vs Draft

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jdoane, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. jdoane

    jdoane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I apparently need a good lesson in thermodynamics! I'm having a hard time getting my head around how one can have good ventilation without drafts. Can someone explain that to me? [​IMG]
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    If a breeze is hitting the chicken, that is a draft. If moisture and ammonia is leaving the coop, that is ventilation. Ammonia comes from their poop. Moisture comes from their pop and their breath.

    Ammonia is lighter than air so it rises. Warm air rises and can hold more moisture than cold air. A breeze blowing between two openings over the chickens’ heads while they are sleeping on the roots is not hitting the chickens. It is taking that lighter than air ammonia and the warmer air out of the coop.

    By the way, I thought Thermo was a fairly easy A in college. I know, I’m weird.
     
  3. jdoane

    jdoane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We have a good amount of ventilation but a lot of it is not over their heads. Will that matter? Is having air coming in at the floor level bad?

    Never took Thermodynamics and I think I'm now wishing I did! LOL
     
  4. Ryley

    Ryley Out Of The Brooder

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    jdoane I'm so glad you asked this question...I've been wondering the same thing!
     
  5. fasschicks

    fasschicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am wondering the same thing. How far should a roost be below the ventilation area so that it doesn't hit the birds as a draft? We plan to have heavier birds.

    Would love to hear what others have set up...measurements?

    Fass
     
  6. MnMPoultry

    MnMPoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use turbine roof vents (exhaust) and a gable vent (intake). All ventilation takes place in the rafters. Hot/moist air out, cool/dry air in.

    This is a 25x25x10 coop.

    A draft would be air coming in and blowing through. IE Opening a window on opposite sides of a room in your house.

    EDIT:

    It's worth noting that the birds think they need to sleep in the rafters, but with the way roof/gable vents work, there's no "draft" blowing through.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2013
  7. fasschicks

    fasschicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    MnMPoultry - my husband asked if we could put a turbine vent in. Our coop will only be 7x5 with a slopped roof (6 birds). I have seen turbine vents before, but it seems like they are run by the wind? So, if there is no wind, will there be no venting or will the hot air still escape as needed out the turbine hole?

    If I were to put in venting in a couple walls of the coop near the ceiling and also install the turbine vent would that help with days of no wind? Would love your expertise on if this would work for our coop size or if a turbine is overkill for a 7x5 coop. Thanks!

    Fass
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: Hot air escapes no matter what.
    It merely pulls MORE when it spins
     
  9. barnaclebob

    barnaclebob Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dont make this too complicated, as long as you have some way for air to escape near the roof and enter down lower you will be fine. If your coop is underventilated you will know.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  10. jdoane

    jdoane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks!!! That makes me feel better!
     

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