Confused-what else is new?!!

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by trilyn, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. trilyn

    trilyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2009
    East Syracuse
    Alright, I've read some posts of people using alfalfa pellets in their chickens diet to increase the orange in their yolks in the winter time. This is something that I would be interested in doing, but pellets or cubes? I have horses also and I use the cubes (roughly 2" square) this time of year because the cost of hay and well, they love them! I have seen alfalfa pellets, they look like humongous rabbit pellets only green. Is this what you're talking about? Wouldn't they be too large for them to eat or are there smaller pellets I'm not aware of? Do you break them up or.......please help! I live in Central NY so if someone around here knows of a particular brand-that would be awesome!
     
  2. lleighmay

    lleighmay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I too use the alfalfa cubes (well, alfalfa timothy) for my horses in place of hay- in my experience they are pretty hard to break up into smaller pieces (Dad and I tried to chop/break some for a convalescent steer we were nursemaiding). I think the pellets would be hard to break up too. It seems to me that rabbit pellets are mostly alfalfa; I wonder if they would work? I've also wondered about the "hay stretcher" pellets you can pick up at the local feed stores this time of year. Sorry I'm not much help but I too will be anxiously awaiting advice from the experts of BYC [​IMG]
     
  3. rdranch

    rdranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've read here that some people soften with water and some just break up the cubes. Our alfalfa is bought by the bale and I just give them part of a flake now and then. Experiment and see what works best for your flock.[​IMG]
     
  4. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Olympia, WA
    Rabbit pellets are mostly alfalfa and not too hard to break up. I'm heading into town now, but I'll pull the tag off the bag when I get back if you want the complete ingredient list and nutritional breakdown. I haven't fed these to my hens on purpose, but they free range and do love to go clean up under the rabbit hutches.
     
  5. trilyn

    trilyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2009
    East Syracuse
    Quote:I've got a rabbit too, a jersey wooley (cute little black and white doe) and yeah, you're right about them cleaning up under the hutch, I'm not sure they're eating just the pellets though! [​IMG] I'll have to go and check the bag of feed, I do remember alfalfa being a main component.

    lleighmay I've also wondered about the "hay stretcher" pellets you can pick up at the local feed stores this time of year.

    Yup, those are what I'm talking about-if anyone uses them-how so?

    Thanks for the responses everybody-I really appreciate the help!! [​IMG]
     
  6. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,873
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    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    Quote:I've got a rabbit too, a jersey wooley (cute little black and white doe) and yeah, you're right about them cleaning up under the hutch, I'm not sure they're eating just the pellets though! [​IMG] I'll have to go and check the bag of feed, I do remember alfalfa being a main component.

    lleighmay I've also wondered about the "hay stretcher" pellets you can pick up at the local feed stores this time of year.

    Yup, those are what I'm talking about-if anyone uses them-how so?

    Thanks for the responses everybody-I really appreciate the help!! [​IMG]

    Well, I'm sure they're eating pellets, but I don't know if they're limiting themselves to just the feed pellets......[​IMG] I agree, though the dogs kitty roca obsesion is worse.
     
  7. trilyn

    trilyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2009
    East Syracuse
    Quote:I've got a rabbit too, a jersey wooley (cute little black and white doe) and yeah, you're right about them cleaning up under the hutch, I'm not sure they're eating just the pellets though! [​IMG] I'll have to go and check the bag of feed, I do remember alfalfa being a main component.

    lleighmay I've also wondered about the "hay stretcher" pellets you can pick up at the local feed stores this time of year.

    Yup, those are what I'm talking about-if anyone uses them-how so?

    Thanks for the responses everybody-I really appreciate the help!! [​IMG]

    Well, I'm sure they're eating pellets, but I don't know if they're limiting themselves to just the feed pellets......[​IMG] I agree, though the dogs kitty roca obsesion is worse.

    Oh man, that's nasty-do you let him lick you when he's done? lol [​IMG] I always let my dogs lick me and then want to kick myself in the butt afterwards, knowing where they've put their mouths that day! Ugh!! [​IMG]
     
  8. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    I would use either Alfalfa Meal, Alfalfa Pellets or Alfalfa Cubes. Rabbit Pellets are for the most part Alfalfa But it has a lot of extra salt that your chickens don't need...
    Weather you use the Alfalfa Meal, Alfalfa Pellets or Alfalfa Cubes you can soak it in water over night then the next morning or night just drain it and feed it...
    Alfalfa is a good source of Protein at around 17%, calcium, plus other minerals, vitamin A, vitamins in the B group, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, and vitamin K.


    Chris
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2009
  9. Cindy in PA

    Cindy in PA Overrun With Chickens

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    Fleetwood, PA
    I use the alfalfa cubes. I soak them in warm water for an hour or so & break them apart with a trowel. I throw the wet clumps in the run & they scratch and eat the leafy parts and leave the stems.
     
  10. DawnSuiter

    DawnSuiter Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'm using pigeon pellets... less salt than the alternatives and a smaller easier to eat size.
     

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