Constant leaking of urea

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Cindilou, Jan 2, 2011.

  1. Cindilou

    Cindilou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 2, 2011
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    1) What type of bird , age and weight.
    Female black star, approximately 2 months

    2) What is the behavior, exactly.
    Normal behavior pattern, eating and drinking normally, also fecal matter comes out normally, just continues to leak urea

    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms?
    This has been going on for a month

    4) Are other birds exhibiting the same symptoms?
    None of the other 7 birds have this happening

    5) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma.
    In the beginning, the vent area looked raw and the urea was irritating the area, over the past month the area has healed and feathers are coming in it does seem to be slowing down as far as the amount leaking per day. For example, I was originally washing this one in the sink more than once a day now we are to about every few days.

    6) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation.
    Unknown

    7) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all.
    All 8 chickens eat Purina, the sick chicken also gets pediatric electrolytes in addition to water

    8) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc.
    The fecal matter looks normal, there is less urea on top of each dropping since it constantly comes out.

    9) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?
    I am lucky enough to have a friend who is a vet and he looked at a fecal sample under a scope and there are no parasites nor harmful bacteria in the sample. We have given baths frequently, yogurt, pediatric electrolytes.

    10 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet?
    The bird is stable, eating, drinking, alert, allowed to forage now (since the sample did not have any indication of parasite or harmful bacteria) and actually a very nice bird because it is handled so much.

    11) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.
    Think: white stuff on the bottom, coming out of the vent.

    12) Describe the housing/bedding in use
    She has been on newspaper in a separate cage in a garage while the other chickens are outside in a coop and run. The run was built in the beginning of December and all other birds moved in and this one was caught with urea on the bottom so it didn't get the chance to move in yet.

    So, does this sound like just a terrible case of pasty butt or something else?
     
  2. RhodeIslandRedFan

    RhodeIslandRedFan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cindilou - What you describe reminds me of this thread (see link below) about a condition called vent gleet, which is a yeast infection that causes white discharge. I have no experience with this so can offer you no first-hand advice, but perhaps what you read in this thread may help. Good luck to both you and your chicken!
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=433048
     
  3. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    I wish I had an answer........ I would think she may have an internal infection of sorts. I would put her on an antibiotic and see if anything improves.
     
  4. Cindilou

    Cindilou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just that, since there is no bacterial infection nor parasitic infection shown in the fecal sample it would not be a good idea for antibiotics.
     
  5. Cindilou

    Cindilou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks, I'll research the vent gleet more.
     
  6. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeast infections are a common side effect of giving antibiotics. Ordinary antibiotics kill bacteria, giving the yeast and fungus already present an opportunity to grow like crazy.
     
  7. Cindilou

    Cindilou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Just like in humans, antibiotics given willy-nilly can do more harm than good. I'm thinking that if it is not vent gleet then it is perhaps an excretory system problem possibly originating in the kidneys. And you are absolutely correct about yeasts and fungi, they can get out of control after a dose of antibiotics takes out the beneficial bacteria that keep them in check.
     
  8. Cindilou

    Cindilou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Had to put down Diamond today. She was a nice gal but just never got better, never gained weight.
    A little sad about it.
     

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