Conveyor belt??

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by wood&feathers, Jul 31, 2011.

  1. wood&feathers

    wood&feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was at a local park and saw a huge roll of discarded conveyor belt uglying up the place. Could this be a good material for coop walls, floor or roof covering? It is some seriously heavy stuff, quite stiff, with a tough rubber coating. Doesn't seem to have a smell.

    If I figure out how to use it I can get more too - there are a couple small local outfits who travel around the country doing conveyor maintenance, I assume one of them discarded this roll.
     
  2. Chemguy

    Chemguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You see coop security, I think VERY LARGE BROODER! Back to your question, though, I think that the weight could be a problem if it is an industrial belt. As long as the supports are strong enough, I don't see why it wouldn't work. I would make sure to trim off any frayed wire or fiber before presenting it to chickens.
     
  3. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    wood&feathers :

    I was at a local park and saw a huge roll of discarded conveyor belt uglying up the place. Could this be a good material for coop walls, floor or roof covering? It is some seriously heavy stuff, quite stiff, with a tough rubber coating. Doesn't seem to have a smell.

    If I figure out how to use it I can get more too - there are a couple small local outfits who travel around the country doing conveyor maintenance, I assume one of them discarded this roll.

    I have seen it used for flooring in horse trailers. That stuff is worth its weight in gold if you can get it home. Sell it by the foot on Craigslist. Its good for all sorts of things. But yes it is very heavy you might need a tractor to get it up onto a trailer..... Or you can cut it into manageable lengths. I would suspect a linoleum knife would do the trick.

    good find.​
     
  4. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've tried to work with that stuff and cutting it is nigh unto impossible. The belt material was half inch thick.
     
  5. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    Quote:LOL Maybe a saw with an abrasive blade? The stuff I saw was canvas with a rubber backing.... no more than an eighth inch thick.... OF course ... Slapping my forehead ... there would be all sorts of thicknesses depending on length and material it was designed to move.
     

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