Convincing Husband

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by 3baymares, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. 3baymares

    3baymares Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 20, 2009
    North Atlanta area, USA
    I want chickens badly but my husband thinks they will be just pets that won't pull their wt. expense wise. I also don't think I can kill any of the chicken once they stop laying or are roosters.

    We have a small 6 acre farm. I do only buy organic eggs from the store. Chickens for eggs only are never cost efficient are they??
     
  2. Snakeoil

    Snakeoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can let them free range and feed them very little. Just keep them locked up for a couple of weeks and when you do let them range they will come back every night to be locked up.
     
  3. ruby

    ruby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gold Hill, Alabama
    My opinion is if you raise pullets, they are cost efficient. I can pay for my feed on egg money if I'm diligent about it. I do not have roosters. My personal choice (and advice from family, and traumas early on). Also over buying will cost you money. Do you already have housing for them. That was my biggest expense. Good luck. Or you can do it like I did the Guineas. I bought them when he was out of town.hehehe
     
  4. farmerlor

    farmerlor Chillin' With My Peeps

    My chicken feed costs 13 dollars for a 50lb bag. Since my girlies free range and eat so many kitchen scraps (16 hens, 1 roo) they go through 2 bags per month. I average 13 eggs per day. At one dozen eggs per day, 30 dozen-that would cost me just under 60 dollars at the store. I can sell a dozen eggs for 3 dollar a dozen. I'm thinking the girlies are paying their way.
     
  5. PortageGirl

    PortageGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    If you are buying organic eggs now, you CAN sell the eggs from laying hens to at least pay for their feed. Making up the initial cost may well take a long time, but once they begin laying, they will earn their keep if you're willing to start from that point. You might actually do better than that, but by starting from that point, you will avoid exaggerated expectations.

    You will however need to be able to replace non-productive hens, and excess roosters. You could re-home them, but you cannot afford to feed them if you want them to pay their own way.

    I sympathize with you, a lot, but I have learned to do the 'deed', as much as I dislike it. I've grown up with the necessity, this is the difference between growing up with the tough facts of life on a farm, and growing up with nothing but the grocery store. Keep in mind though, part of the price you pay at the store, is someone has to take care of that end of the business.

    Sorry to sound so grim, but admitting that is part of the price, is also part of what makes the living ones so dear. *pat pat pat*
     
  6. 3baymares

    3baymares Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 20, 2009
    North Atlanta area, USA
    "You can let them free range and feed them very little. Just keep them locked up for a couple of weeks and when you do let them range they will come back every night to be locked up."


    I would love to do that but we have two German Shepherds and our neighbor's dogs are Terriors and always out. Our farm is completely fenced but their Terriers would find a way in if they saw chickens on our property I am guessing.

    Thank you for all the input. I have had chickens before about ,25 years ago, and I have been missing them ever since.
    So, you all have rooster just to have new chickens to replace the hens that stop laying?? By the time the hen stops laying she is going to be kind of tuff meat to eat I would think? And then you'd have to eat all the chicks that were roosters too right?
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2009
  7. ruby

    ruby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The dogs would be a great concern to me. That's why I asked about housing?? If it already exists you can fortify and keep them the out. If you have to start from scratch, it will take a investment. I love dogs. My wonderful best friend (dog) Henry died in June. He did not chase chickens and it made it easy. Now I have no dogs, and the main reason I haven't gotten another dog is the chicken chasing. been there won't go back. And the kids are grown, I want to travel a bit more.
     
  8. 3baymares

    3baymares Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North Atlanta area, USA
    Aw. Henry sounds like he was an exceptional dog.

    We have two barns right now and they easily could be partially used as a coop and we could build a safe run for them. Wire would be our biggest expense.

    How long do chickens live and how long do they lay for? My last flock I had to give away since I was leaving home for college.
     
  9. tinners204

    tinners204 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think chickens are a hobby and if they pay for there selfs than that is good, but if they don't, then oh well!!![​IMG]
     
  10. 3baymares

    3baymares Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North Atlanta area, USA
    Well, that sentiment will not get me some chickens! ha That is exactly what my husband thinks they will be and we already have many of those sorts around the house. Many being .... 10 non human mouths. Horses, guinea pigs, cat, dogs, rabbits. Our feed bill is not small right now.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2009

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