Coop Basics: Windows, weather-proofing and trim questions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by casumm, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. casumm

    casumm Out Of The Brooder

    97
    0
    39
    May 27, 2010
    Indianapolis, IN
    Jumping into my first coop here over the weekend. I haven't built much beyond flatpak furniture at this point. I purchased a solid, basic coop plan but I'd like to modify it by adding a kickstand-style window & vent, trim around doors and openings and a pully for the pophole door. Hopefully someone here can help me wrap my mind around how to achieve these planned changes:

    1) For small windows that will be hinged from the top, is this something a person creates themselves with trim and plexiglass or do you buy those readymade such as for a shed? I was thinking a small 4 panel window for the back of the coop. (Probably about 12X12)

    2) When installing items that hinge from the top and can be propped open, what do I need to be aware of to keep water and drafts out? (I want to add a clear 4 panel window to the back of the coop and a small opaque vent above the pophole door into the run.)

    3) What material do I need to look for if I want to add a simple flat trim to the egg access and side access doors (as well as windows mentioned above)? How do trim pieces affect hardware? (I'm guess there is an offset but not sure if that changes the hardware I need from what I have on my supply list, which would be for a flush, exterior mount. I never know the right "term" to use in the hardware store!)

    4) Can a pully be rigged up for any pophole door? Tips, tricks or suggestions for that would be very appreciated. I've seen alot on the forums but don't have a clear idea of the mechanics behind it (because I'm NOT an engineer. [​IMG])

    Whatever help you can send my way for piece of mind and not to look like a fool at the Big Orange Box is greatly appreciated!!!

    Thanks!

    -chris
     
  2. DarkWolf

    DarkWolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    797
    3
    141
    Nov 11, 2008
    Murray Kentucky
    Quote:Sure you can make your own, so long as you are handy with a table saw and understand the safety of them as well as the basics of putting together utility window framing. It's not hard. Though you get into 4 panel windows and you'll be making life harder.. I'd suggest making the window one piece and having a faux 4 panel, in that a cross of wood would be tacked onto the outside of the window to make it LOOK like they're separate panes.

    Quote:If you have a good overhang from the roof (which is always a good idea) then no.. But if you foresee water running down the wall then yes, you will need flashing above the windows to ensure that water does not run down inside. Far as drafts, some felt stapled down to the inside when the window is closed is more than enough for a good seal.

    Quote:You can use a 1x pine, or if you're good with a table saw and trust your ability, split a 2x4 down the center. Far as how it affects hardware, that depends on how it's installed and what kind. You can always notch out trim when needed.

    Quote:Sure.. I use a pulley on mine. Don't use too thick of a rope to open it though as it may bind.. I've got one of those sail tie off posts, but never use it as my pop door sticks UP when I raise it.. Then I just have to go in and push it back down.. :p

    One of these days I'll fix that.

    Quote:What ever you decide to do, be safe about it.. Can easily get hurt if you dive into something you're not comfortable with doing.. Not saying that you don't know how to do.. Have to learn some how.. But if you're not confident with the tools and have a clear and concise understanding of what steps you will be doing and what might be going on, then it's best to use prefab.

    Back to the windows for a minute.. Instead of building your own, consider a re-store (habitat for humanities) and buying some dirt cheap used windows.. In fact, you can often find some free on Craigslist or Freecycle.. If not cheap.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    93
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:If you want it to look traditional and all that, or have multiple panes of glass, it is a significantly more advanced DIY project. If you just want A Flap Of Plexiglass Hinged On, it's not a big deal at all and can easily be done with hand tools and inexperience [​IMG] (Note that you can fake the look of a 4-pane window by using caulk or an appropriate adhesive to glue fake muntins on to visually divide a single larger piece of plexiglass into 4 apparent panes [​IMG])

    2) When installing items that hinge from the top and can be propped open, what do I need to be aware of to keep water and drafts out?

    I'd suggest weatherstripping, or removeable-caulking, it for wintertime, and don't worry about draftproofing it for the rest of the year. As far as keeping water out, the simplest thing is to put a drip edge of some sort over top of it so that water running down the wall of the coop goes out and then drips down free. You could do that by routing a deepish groove on the underside of a 2x2 that you then screw above the window, or using a premade or homemade metal drip edge, or etc.

    3) What material do I need to look for if I want to add a simple flat trim to the egg access and side access doors (as well as windows mentioned above)? How do trim pieces affect hardware? (I'm guess there is an offset but not sure if that changes the hardware I need from what I have on my supply list, which would be for a flush, exterior mount. I never know the right "term" to use in the hardware store!)

    If you don't mind a little extra expense (but a lot less work and tools required), look in the 'trim' section of the hardware store and you will find plain flat trim that you can use. Doorstop molding for narrow trim, and a large store will have a wider type too (used mainly for fill when building up a fancy crown molding or whatever). Find something that looks right, then use that [​IMG] Construction adhesive is probably sufficient to attach it.

    The easiest thing for your hardware is to put a matching piece of trim under the OTHER half of the hardware, so they're both at the same level [​IMG]

    4) Can a pully be rigged up for any pophole door? Tips, tricks or suggestions for that would be very appreciated. I've seen alot on the forums but don't have a clear idea of the mechanics behind it (because I'm NOT an engineer. [​IMG])

    Yes, it is not difficult, but the details depend on how your coop is set up. It's really not brain surgery, you can figure it out [​IMG] or post some pics.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat​
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by