coop floor - ground or raised

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Justjered, Nov 21, 2016.

  1. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our coop has been an evolution from pallets that were torn apart and made into a coop into a full 70"x48" building with siding, windows and doors.

    Currently our coop is without a raised floor, so it has grass/dirt floor. We live in central Illinois and have winters that get snowy and cold. So I'm wondering if I need to get it raised up off the ground before the condensation appears.

    We've had some pretty heavy wind and rain and so far there hasn't been any water that has came through where the walls meet the ground. I'm just concerned if I need to worry about moisture over the winter. Or if I need to be concerned that the ground will keep my chickens colder compared to having a raised and solid floor in the coop.

    Greatly appreciate any advise you guys and gals can give.
     
  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    There are pros and cons to both 'on the ground' and raised coops.

    I prefer raised off the ground, I was lucky as the building I built my coop in was here when I bought the place and is 2-3' off the ground with an insulated floor. If I built again, I'd have it raised.

    IMO the only advantage of being right on the ground is if you want do do a true composting deep litter.
    But it does introduce the issues of rot to the structure at ground contact, infiltration of water depending on site and runoff situations, easier access for pests and predators to dig in.

    If you do raise it, raise it high enough to get under there if needed, at least 18". It can be a great place for the birds the shelter from heat of the day and rain/snow events.
     
  3. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I guess I should have shown a pic of the coop before I asked. My old coop was a raised 2 story with a run under it. However we expanded and built a more winter capable coop for them that is 3 stories inside on one side and open on the bottom to the ground.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    What does it look like on the inside?
    I see very little ventilation.....very important all year round.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    IMO, the only reason for having a raised coop, with wood floor is to prevent rot issues, and to help things stay dry if you have drainage issues. Building a stable coop without a floor, if it's a larger structure can be difficult as well, but I'm sure it can be done. My biggest issue is I refuse to use PT wood, and my hubby does building design for a living, so he would not abide having our new coop not be up to his standards for structural integrity. And, where we built our coop, the drainage was an issue, so standard construction was the appropriate choice. All that being said, in your situation, if it ain't broke, why try to fix it. My question is this: with 2 - 3 stories in the coop shown, how much floor to ceiling space is there, and what is the floor/ceiling height between those stories. What does that give you for perch height, and space between the perch and the ceiling. These dimensions can have huge effect on how well the birds survive the winter without frost bite issues. I am an advocate of deep litter in both coop and run, and have found it impossible to do a true DL in my floored coop, while my old CP coop is awesome for DL. The chickens go running to that old coop every day when I let them out. They have told me by their actions which style of coop they prefer!
     
  6. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    Plenty of ventilation. The top is mounted to the walls with a 2x4 spacing at the top with mesh to keep wild stuff out.

    Also have a sliding screened window that we open in the summer for air flow and close for cold weather for less flow.

    Floor has been nice and dry so far without any seeping in from outside (but haven't had snow piles up yet.

    I'll get some pics in a sec but the floor has a frame that the walls mount to with the room mounted on a frame which is mounted to the walls.

    Height inside. I have silkies. So they are bantams. But yes in my opinion. Plenty of room.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2016
  7. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] top floor with rising area
     
  8. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    Nesting box area is the middle floor
     
  9. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]bottom is where they have the most floor space and covered food and water.
     
  10. Justjered

    Justjered Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] walkin area and shows roost extending in feont of their window for a view.
     

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