Coop flooring question

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Annemade, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. Annemade

    Annemade Chirping

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    I am in the planning stage of building a bigger coop for my girls. They are currently in a store bought coop that is inside of a 10 x 12 foot run. The new coop will be outside of the current run, but attached. What are the advantages of dirt floor verses wooden floor? If I go with a wooden floor, does it need to be raised off the ground?
     
  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    If you're interested in using a true composting deep litter inside your coop,
    it's best to use the ground for coop 'floor'.
    Can be detrimental in areas that are wet, flood, etc.

    If floor is wood, best to raise it a good bit to keep it from rotting or becoming a habitat for rodents and other pests.....OR block access to under there with mesh or concrete foundation.

    Lots of options depending on your climate, the sites micro-climate and ground configuration, construction techniques......

    I like my raised(24-30") floor shed where coop is built. Shed was existing. Part is fenced off as part of run and makes a nice space for birds to lounge out of the weather and dust bathe almost all year round. I fenced part of it off so I can get under there if necessary without crawling too far(~4').
     
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  3. Annemade

    Annemade Chirping

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    My run is wood framed using treated 2x6 at the bottom to resist rotting. I was thinking of using the same treated 2x6 with plywood for flooring on top. Coop would be tall enough for me to stand up in, with a slanted roof. Planning on 8x10 feet for coop so the girls can stay in side and still move around if too cold in winter. Was even thinking about putting down a vinyl rent on the floor for easy cleaning. What are your thoughts?
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    I used a single sheet of good heavy duty foam baked vinyl in my coop,
    has held up well for 4 years but my floor is raised and bedding is dry shavings.
    Check out My Coop page....link under avatar or in my articles.

    Your foundation of treated lumber sounds good, install an anti-dig apron on all 4 sides of coop to keep rodents and other pests out from under coop floor.....might want to go with 1/4" mesh for mouse exclusion.
    Couple of examples:
    http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1110498/wire-around-coop#post_17093528
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/new-coop-project.1169916/page-2#post-18481208
     
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  5. Annemade

    Annemade Chirping

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    I have been installing at apron around the run and will also around the coop. The 1/4 inch sounds like a good idea for under the entire coop. Do you recommend insulating the walls for Michigan winters? I am between Detroit and Lansing.
     
  6. I dug a 1 foot footing all the way around, then cinder blocks and built off that . Dirt floor:)

    Gary
     
  7. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie Gallus gallus domesticus

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    Boom! Can't argue with that! :thumbsup
     
  8. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie Gallus gallus domesticus

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    We have last seasons hay for bedding. $3 for round bales. Hens spend most of the time ranging so we only have to swap the old Bermuda coastal out once a week.
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Insulation is a 6 of 1, half dozen of the other kind of thing.

    It can help to deter cold transferring thru the walls and floor, and slow heat gain thru the roof/ceiling. But as far as it 'holding heat' in a building (like a house) the ventilation needed in a chicken coop makes 'holding heat' moot.

    It will raise your costs significantly, not just for the insulation itself but having to sheath the inside walls to keep the birds from eating it. Plus that scenario sets up nice housing for rodents and insects, and if they do get in there are much harder to eradicate. Some say foam insulation, full cavity fill, is less likely to be infiltrated by pests...but....

    IMO insulation in a chicken coop has more cons than pros. Plenty of cold climate coops don't have it.
     
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  10. Folly's place

    Folly's place Crossing the Road

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    Welcome, Annemade! I'm not far away, south of Perry. I have some coop insulation, and am tearing a lot of it out because of the rodent problem. Ugh! Ceiling insulation is worth it, IMO, because it also helps with summer sun, but be careful about insulating the walls, so you don't promote a rodent colony. Mary
     
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