Coop in Progress. Would appreciate input on the design.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by CT_Todd, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. CT_Todd

    CT_Todd Chirping

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    Aug 5, 2010
    Hebron, CT
    I will add pictures soon which I am sure will help in forming comments..
    FYI: The coop will hold 6 full size hens and I live in CT. (Chicken Breeds: 2 Dominiques, 2 East Eggers, 2 Wyandottes)
    There are question built into the summary as well.
    THANKS A BUNCH FOR ANY INPUT:)

    Here is what I got to work with on the inside: The coop's approx interior dimensions are 9 by 4.5 feet. (front part of the coop is aprox 6 and 1/2 feet tall and it slopes down towards the back to around 5 feet or so)
    I have one 17 x 32 foot slider window installed on one wall. (the long wall)
    I have a good size vent that I will add to the highest point in the front of the coop. (the short wall on the front of the coop)
    I was thinking of adding another small vent on the same wall as the window. (Most likely the windown screen will get closed in the winter so that second vent will be needed??)

    Since the coop was being built from using an existing shed, half the coop remains 'inside'. I basically split the shed right down the center for the coop. Still have 4.5 feet that you can walk into the shed between the shed's ouside wall and the coop's wall. That side of the coop's wall, I put a full door in wide enough for a large broom that you can easily sweep out the shavings and what I call an 'observation' window. I framed out an area with the wall studs and covered it in galvanized wire. Then when I put the plywood over it, I cut a hole in the plywood to match the opening and put that section on hinges with 2 locking bolts. If you ever want to look at the chickens, or give extra air, all you have to do is slide the bolts open and the section of wall drops/swings open to form a 'window'. I can keep this open in the warmer months and since the opening is wired, they will be safe from predators.

    For the floor, I framed over the concrete (the entire shed floor was concrete already) and put plywood down. Michele (wife) painted the entire interior of the coop white.
    The other thing thats nice, is there is still 4.5 X 13 feet of shed space as well as another 3 or 4 feet of shed space behind the coop's back wall for storage etc..

    The only things left to do on the coop exterior are to install the front wall (studs are in place), front wall vent and chicken door and to reinforce/frame the human coop door)

    After that, I need to figure out where everything is going to go on the inside of the coop..Roosting pole, nest boxes, food/water etc...(Lots of people are using a board to catch the droppings under the roosting pole.)
    Some of the reading I am doing, many people seem to be putting self sticky vinyl tileson the plywood under the shavings..which makes cleaning very easy?

    So some questions about the coop itself..
    Do I have enough/too many vents?
    Any part of the coop need insulation? (I was not planning on this)

    Once I get the inside all set, then I plan on building the run next

    Here is a rough sketch
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2010

  2. MrChicken207

    MrChicken207 Chirping

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    Jun 4, 2010
    Caribou, Maine
    I wouldn't insulate it at all, CT is a bit warmer than where I'm at, (although at times in the past few years you've gotten more snow storms than we have) with the breeds you've chosen, you don't have to worry much about frostbite. You've got plenty of space inside their pen (6.75 sq feet per bird, not counting area removed for nest boxes, feeders, and waterers. Skip the dropping board under the roost, I think it's just a waste of effort (one more thing you have to clean if you put it in). I'd go with the vinyl tile and then use a deep bedding on top of it. Initially, I wouldn't have put a plywood floor at all and left the concrete (easy to clean).

    As far as ventilation is concerned, other places on this forum have suggested 1 sq foot of vent space per bird. So, if you have 6 birds, then 6 sq feet of vent.

    I'd build the run as wide as the shed side that you're putting it against, If that is the 13 ft long side of the shed, then I'd make it 16 to 20 feet long, but that's just me. Others might suggest only a dozen or so feet would be more than enough on that side of the shed.
     
  3. CT_Todd

    CT_Todd Chirping

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    Aug 5, 2010
    Hebron, CT
    Quote:Thanks Mr Chicken...

    6 Sq ft of vent seems like a ton of open (drafty?) wall space??
    Vinyl tile and deep bedding it will be! Plus with the large door and raised platform floor it will be easy to sweep it all out onto a tarp or something..

    As to the run, agree with you and was part of my thinking..using the building as a natural 'frame' to attach the run to and extend off of it..I plan on making the run nice and very large..

    PS...I know very well about your winters..Most of my family (and I at one time) live/come from Grand Falls, New Brunwick..Not very far from you at all.
     
  4. MrChicken207

    MrChicken207 Chirping

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    Jun 4, 2010
    Caribou, Maine
    That statement is not a surprise to me at all. I have alot of family in CT. In the Hebron area, mostly. I actually grew up 45 minutes north of Caribou, so this "big city" is a bit of a different experience. I'd prefer to live in the more rural parts of town, but have to be patient with convincing the wife on it. Little bits at a time. We're working on having some children, so if the teenagers keep running their cars up an down our street, it might convince her more quickly to move to a quieter part with a larger yard for the kids to play in, and the only really dangerous traffic would be potato trucks for 2 weeks in the spring and 2 weeks in the fall.
     

  5. ADozenGirlz

    ADozenGirlz The Chicken Chick[IMG]emojione/assets/png/00ae.png

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    Oct 18, 2009
    Connecticut
    I live in Suffield, Connecticut and in the middle of last winter, we insulated the roof of our coop. We have cold hardy birds too but I wasn't comfortable when I saw that the water began freezing in the coop. That's where I draw the line. We would keep a 250watt red heat lamp in there when it got into the low 30s and it was enough to keep the water fluid. (You can see my coop set-up in detail on my BYC page. It's 4x6, and I have 18 birds, 6 of which are bantams.)

    We also added north and south facing windows to our coop this summer (in addition to the west and east facing windows) b/c there simply wasn't enough air movement in the coop at night and the birds had their mouths agape at night, which was horrible. More ventilation is always better than not enough. Here's a great page on ventilation:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=1642-VENTILATION

    Good luck with your coop and keep us updated with pictures!
     

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