Coop-land Defense

NattiFan

Songster
9 Years
Mar 1, 2010
216
0
129
Plainfield, CT
I am very new and haven't yet begun to build my first coop. One thing that bothers me is my location next to woods and all the different critters that may come up to my coop at night and nose around. We have Coyotes, fisher cats, skunks, fox, and god knows what else is living in the woods. My question is has anyone tried any methods to keep predators away from their coops? Coop-land defense?? LOL..... Like a perimeter of sorts?? I may be way off base with this, but the thought of running string in the area of the coop with those old metal pie plates that will rattle if moved came to mind....I wouldn't be as nervous if the coop would be closer to the house, or at least have some sort of light on it, but where it's going, there isn't any light, and it's about 50 yards from my back door. Any sugestions will be greatly apprectiated
 

Kittymomma

Songster
10 Years
Sep 9, 2009
3,873
31
204
Olympia, WA
There is lots of good info. here on that, do a search for fort knox coops. A couple of things are to use hardware cloth for the run and over any ventelation openings on the coop. Also run an apron of hardware cloth around the run to keep preds. from digging in and if you can do it nothing beats a couple of strands of electric fence around the perimeter of your set up. FYI--build bigger then you think you need, chickens are addictive!

welcome-byc.gif
 

NattiFan

Songster
9 Years
Mar 1, 2010
216
0
129
Plainfield, CT
Thanks for replying kittymomma. I have been enjoying this site and some other reading material for the last couple weeks, and have heard all about hardware cloth on the windows and vents and to enclose the run. As well as laying some on the ground around the run, I plan on burying some 10 inches to a foot or so down into the ground. Electric fence is not an option. No power back there. I will look into Fort Knox coops today!
smile.png
thank you
 

Kittymomma

Songster
10 Years
Sep 9, 2009
3,873
31
204
Olympia, WA
I have a parmak solar fence charger to keep the cows out of my garden so don't write electric off just because of a lack of power. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying you have to do electric, but if it would make you feel more comfortable to have it look into the solar chargers, they've come a long way in the last 10 years or so.
 

Penturner

Songster
9 Years
Feb 1, 2010
889
14
131
Reno Nevada
Anything like string or pots and pans the critter will just grow used to. An electric fence hurts and they never get used to that. Building the coop strong is the best defense. I am making mine from chicken wire and plan to give it a good long test before any of my birds go in it. but the bottom 24 inches is solid 2X8 and the top foot or so is solid wood as well. it will be covered. The idea is that to push their way through wire they need to be able to push. it is a bit hard to do much pushing 2 feet off the ground. not that they won't try it will just reduce the strength they can apply. I will also attach the wire att he edges with staples, then cover that with a 1X2 firring strip. an animal will have to be able to actually tear through the wire to get to the birds. I am considering switching to hardware cloth rather than chicken wire still. It is twice the cost but if chicken wire will not hold it is nothing more than wasting half the money.
 

Intheswamp

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 25, 2009
2,373
112
256
South Alabama
Solar isn't even required. A plug-in electric fence charger will do just fine. Install the charger at your house and run a single suspended wire to your chicken coop. Use a few poles with insulators. Electric fence chargers are usually used to energize several miles of fences so your 150' is just a hop skip and jump for it. Ground the fence charger well. You could use insulated wire for the overhead run (same gauge as the electric fence wire), but still use insulators.

Pay attention to detail...the minks and weasels can get through the eye of a needle. Fishers?...how about solid burglar bars spaced closely together in concrete?
hmm.png


Best wishes,
Ed
 

joebryant

Crowing
11 Years
Apr 28, 2008
5,542
43
271
SW of Greenwood, INDIANA
NattiFan, I want to commend you for considering how to save your chickens BEFORE building their home for them, so many people don't. If you were building your own home in an area or murdering thugs, you'd do whatever you had to do 100% to protect your family and yourself. You and everyone else should do the same for animals regardless of the initial expense; in the long run, your not having to worry about them is worth the extra money that you spend one time but lasts for years, i.e., don't try to cut corners.
 

Daidohead

Songster
10 Years
Nov 6, 2009
352
0
119
Red Bluff, Ca
Building a secure coop has been the ticket for me. My ladies are locked in every night, have a covered run to hang out in during the day, and get to free range anytime I am around to watch them. Nothing larger than a mouse can ge into my coop, nothing larger than a rat can get into my run, as for free range we are on our own.

I don't worry about what may be wondering around the coop at night because I know the ladies are safe and secure. They sleep well, and so do I.

You can spend hundreds, if not thousands trying to secure a perimeter and still nature will get through. Securing one small spot is easy, cheap, and effective.
 

gsim

Songster
10 Years
Jun 18, 2009
1,997
41
196
East Tennessee
Quote:
welcome-byc.gif

I live on 15 acres, most woods. Woods all around too. I did 2x4 galv welded wire 6 ft tall, set in cement. Then I put a 24" tall roll of chicken wire around the inside to keep the chooks from sticking their heads through. Then I electrified it and ran 4 courses of hot wire all around and included the gate.

The coop is like a small house and nothing can get into it except a bull elephant or a two-legged skunk. So I have 2 lines of defense overnight, and one during the day. So far so good.

wink.png
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom