1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

coop materials question

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by JaceAgain, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. JaceAgain

    JaceAgain Chillin' With My Peeps

    430
    43
    118
    Feb 24, 2014
    Coastal NC
    I'm searching for materials to use on my coop, and came across a thread where the person used cement board instead of osb or plywood, but there wasn't any sort of follow up and I can't find anything on it anywhere on the internet.

    Have you used cement board? Do I still have to side it? or paint it?
    Do I just screw it into 2x4s?

    What is the cheapest/best material for roofing? I was thinking that wavy plastic stuff but I have no idea how to install that...
     
  2. barnaclebob

    barnaclebob Chillin' With My Peeps

    142
    9
    71
    Sep 24, 2012
    Cement board should work but its more difficult to cut IMO. You could probably just paint it and be fine but I'm not sure about that.

    I have only used cement board in my bathroom, not in a chicken coop.
     
  3. LaurelC

    LaurelC Chillin' With My Peeps

    364
    30
    121
    Mar 22, 2013
    Bothell, WA
    Corrugated plastic roofing is very easy to work with. You can cut it with a circular saw or with tin snips. It is fastened to supportive wavy-cut cross-pieces using screws that have rubber washers on them to seal.
     
  4. JaceAgain

    JaceAgain Chillin' With My Peeps

    430
    43
    118
    Feb 24, 2014
    Coastal NC
    What did you use on your coop? I wasn't planning on cutting it, but I just realized it'll mess up my dimensions so I'd have to have some hardware mesh from 5-7ft. Like this one- https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/174173/osb-oriented-strand-board-question
     
  5. JaceAgain

    JaceAgain Chillin' With My Peeps

    430
    43
    118
    Feb 24, 2014
    Coastal NC
    Oh good to know!
     
  6. barnaclebob

    barnaclebob Chillin' With My Peeps

    142
    9
    71
    Sep 24, 2012
    I used OSB painted inside and out. Has held up through 2 pacific northwest winters so far but we have our coop positioned so that it does not get water on it unless there are very high winds.

    The roof is corrugated fiberglass. The best thing you can do for your coop and run is to make the roof overhang big enough to keep the water out of it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    19,950
    3,111
    476
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    I haven’t used cement board but helped my brother-in-law put some on his porch. He was very careful to seal every edge against moisture by painting it. Maybe something to check out.
     
  8. FVRM

    FVRM Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'm thinking of using cement board for my coop. It's rot resistant so you don't have to paint it unless you want to make it look nice. The only problem I know of is that it can dull your power tool blade if you cut it. I think you have to use a certain blade for that. And you have to pre drill the hole for the screw.

    DONT USE THE PLASTIC ROOFING MATERIAL. It's super lightweight and breaks super easily and it's super expensive. The best material for the roof is the metal type of material. I never had to cut it because I built the coop according to the measurements of the roof material. I've heard tin snips can cut it though.
     
  9. JaceAgain

    JaceAgain Chillin' With My Peeps

    430
    43
    118
    Feb 24, 2014
    Coastal NC
    That seems odd since it says it protects from moisture?
    • New formula - Same durable performance with faster, easier installation
    • Creates a smooth, level, stable surface for installing tile or stone on walls, floors or countertops
    • 3 ft. x 5 ft. coverage area
    • Composed of stable Portland cement, aggregates and reinforcement
    • 3 ft. x 5 ft. coverage area.
    • Protects against excessive moisture in wet areas such as showers, saunas and steam rooms.
     
  10. LaurelC

    LaurelC Chillin' With My Peeps

    364
    30
    121
    Mar 22, 2013
    Bothell, WA
    I think it depends on what type of plastic roofing material you're talking about. Fiberglass has a tendency to break, then there's PVC, which is opaque or transparent, but not clear. You can get polycarbonate SunTuf roofing that can stand up to very large hail and strong winds. 8' sheets of polycarbonate roofing are under $30 at my local hardware store and have the benefit of transmitting light.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by