Coop nearly done. Flooring question

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Larkspur88, Jun 10, 2011.

  1. Larkspur88

    Larkspur88 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Coop only needs the fencing and I can put my chickens inside it at least but then I realized that the coop floor needs a layer of something. We cemented it down but we want to put something over the top of it (even if just dirt) any suggestions? Is dirt the best option? I see pine shavings becoming a royal mess outside in the yard. But then again that would keep down the smell! We are new to this.
     
  2. BoltonChicken

    BoltonChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would put a layer of dirt maybe 4" deep. include some sand and gravel in the dirt. They like to dig into that and scratch around. Over that I would lay 2 to 3 inches of
    pine shavings, which absorb and dissipate moisture quickly. This is assuming that you have a cover over the coop and run. The chicks will mix the dirt with the pine shavings
    and make a good fertilizer. If smell becomes a problem spread out some Sweet PDZ over the whole thing.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2011
  3. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pine shavings are the most popular, some use sand and there are other options like ground walnut shells and corn cobs. Not sure how expensive they are. Would not recommend dirt,personally I use shavings. Its fairly inexpensive,dries quickly and mixes well with chicken poop. When you clean out the coop you can throw it in the compost pile and you got great fertilizer for the garden after it tempers for a while. The drawback is yes the shavings do manage to get out in many ways. Via your feet,the chickens feet and mine scratch in it literally kicking it out the pop door. I dont think there is anything you can use that wont escape in some fashion. To help contain it to the run you could attach a strip of landscape cloth or silt fence along the outside of the run,maybe 6 or 8 inches up. Even that will only cut down and not eliminate it.
     
  4. tuppence

    tuppence New Egg

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    Jun 10, 2011
    hello, do you mean bark from the garden centre, usesd on flower borders, sorry to butt in but i am new to this way way of keeping chickens
     
  5. nuchickontheblock

    nuchickontheblock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't use bark chips that are intended to mulch around trees, etc. - they can be very toxic to animals.
    Pine shavings (don't use cedar shavings) can be purchased in feed stores, pet stores, etc.
     
  6. essig

    essig Out Of The Brooder

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    I like to use straw which absorbs well and is easy to clean up. It also doesn't track outside as much as pine shavings do. The chickens love to dig through the fresh pile looking for seeds that may still be in it. I use shavings for the brooders or any temporary housing.
     
  7. BoltonChicken

    BoltonChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, by ALL means do NOT use pine bark mulch! The prior poster is correct in that cedar shavings should be shunned also. Pine shavings is available almost everywhere,
    come in 2 cubic feet bags that expand to 8 cubic feet when opened. Covers about 75 square feet to a good depth.
    I have read in many places that straw does not absorb the moisture in the poop which tends to clump strands of the straw together. Will not swear to that, because I
    use pine shavings over dirt. My family was doing that over sixty years ago. [​IMG]
     
  8. Larkspur88

    Larkspur88 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! I was going to use the shavings in the coop house only. As far as the run I'm leaving it dirt and will rake it and add dirt/sand as needed
     
  9. tuppence

    tuppence New Egg

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    thanks, i think iwilluse hay then i know a few farmers round here i can get it fairly cheaply and ican use it as flooring and in the nest boxes aswell. and i love the smell of fresh bales
     
  10. bryan99705

    bryan99705 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Suggest coarse sand as it does not generate a lot of waste and mess, nor does it absorb moisture and mildew / rot. Sand is cheap, cleans up like kitty litter and if it spills out on the ground....so what. It also is another source of grit and lets the birds dust bath. Another advantage is if your fount is inside, it is less mess than having chips in the tray every time a chicken scratches or flaps it's wings.
     

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