COOP Questions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Brian, Sep 30, 2007.

  1. Brian

    Brian Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 30, 2007
    Jacksonville, ORegon
    Hello all. I am about to build a coop, and I am wondering why egg laying boxes are designed to be accessible from the exterior of the coop? Is there a reason other than convenience? I don't mind walking into the coop to collect eggs. Secondly, do the nesting boxes need a roof over them, or are vertical dividers on the sides enough? Finally, what is the best water dispenser?

    Here in So Oregon it will get down into the teens in the winter. Do I need to supply heat?

    Thank you,
    Brian
     
  2. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    Brian. I hope I can help....

    The exterior nest boxes are mainly for ease in collecting eggs. I for one love to go inside to get the eggs....this gives me a chance to " check things out better" I have several types of nests....but the covered ones seem to be the favorite for my gals. I do have "row type nests...with dividers" The Buff Orps seem to like them. For water, in the winter...I use those rubber hog dishes. They are easier to get the ice out, just dump them over. Providing heat will depend on the breed of chicken you have...smaller combs will be able to tollerate the cold better....and the security of your coop....draft free, insulated?? I only provide heat for my Banty Cochin Frizzles. They tend to get cold easier. Just a heat lamp, on the coldest nights. If your coop is draft free...and they have plenty straw/shaveings to snuggle into..they should be fine.
     
  3. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

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    Jun 10, 2007
    Douglasville GA
    One thing that I've learned about nest boxes with just dividers... sometimes a hen will wind up roosting on a divider, which means one of the boxes gets filled with poop.
     
  4. horsewishr

    horsewishr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2007
    West Michigan
    Hanging boxes outside the coop also gives your hens more room inside the coop. That's the main reason I did it. If you're going to put them inside, make sure you put a steeply slanted top on them. Otherwise your chickens will roost on them and cover 'em with poop.

    I do think I may install one box inside my coop. I'm worried about comfort during the winter, and an inside box seems cozier.
     
  5. LisaJean

    LisaJean Chillin' With My Peeps

    I decided to put my post here, instead of starting a new thread for it.

    I wanted to get feedback on my coop idea. I have a nice spot in mind. Right now I have an old rusty metal shed in the corner of the yard, where the vines have grown over the roof. It's in shambles, and I don't really keep much in it. So I am going to tear it down, and put the coop in that corner.

    They will have plenty of shade for the summer, and I can easily see it from the kitchen window.

    For my actual coop, I was thinking of buying one of those pre-fab little sheds, the ones that look like a little house, and then converting it into a coop. I figure that way, if the chickens don't work out, I will still have a nice little shed for other uses.

    Then I will attach the run onto the shed, and put in nest boxes, etc. I can run an electric cord out to the shed from the outlet on the back of the house.

    I have a fenced yard, so I figure I can let the gang out into the yard for a little while each evening. Chickens in Raleigh must be pennd, but I think if I am supervising them it would be ok to let them out.

    Does this sound like a good plan? Has anyone else used one of those little pre-fab sheds and converted it to a coop?
     
  6. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    For my actual coop, I was thinking of buying one of those pre-fab little sheds, the ones that look like a little house, and then converting it into a coop. I figure that way, if the chickens don't work out

    ....


    ...if things dont work out.....thats funny. So what do you do if you end up with 3x the chickens you intended!!!

    Seriously though, I have a prefab as a goat barn, works great. As long as it is predator proof you should be good.​
     
  7. LisaJean

    LisaJean Chillin' With My Peeps

    ...if things dont work out.....thats funny. So what do you do if you end up with 3x the chickens you intended!!!

    Heeheehee. Well, I am hoping not to have a rooster, so hopefully I can keep the numbers under control.

    If I ended up needing to "get rid of" my chickens, I would find them good homes. I already work in animal rescue, so I am very strict when it comes to approving one of my animals' new forever homes.

    But I don't want to have to do that, so I'm doing lots of research before I buy a single bird, to make sure it's really something I want to do.

    Seriously though, I have a prefab as a goat barn, works great. As long as it is predator proof you should be good.

    Awesome! Thanks for the input!​
     
  8. TxChiknRanchers

    TxChiknRanchers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 18, 2007
    Southeast Texas
    :|
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2007

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