Coop requirements for the very cold states like NY

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by tberggren, Feb 2, 2008.

  1. tberggren

    tberggren Chillin' With My Peeps

    450
    0
    149
    Jan 20, 2008
    Ithaca NY
    I don't have to worry about this right now, as I won't have chickens until April, but for next year. The farm we are moving to has a nice building that we will use at least to start with for our coop. But it has only boards for the wall and absolutely no type of insulation, and there are some (not a ton) gaps in the boards, so I am concerned about will it be warm enough or should I try to insulate it somehow.

    If I have to insulate it, I am wondering what I can do that the chickens will leave alone. I have visions of them eating fiberglass insulation, can't imagine that would be a good thing.

    I was thinking of possible putting a layer of plastic inside then adding my hardware wire (which I am planning on putting up to insure that the chickens stay safe from the "bad critters" ;o)

    What are your thoughts? If you have a better idea I would gladly give it consideration.

    Thanks so much.
     
  2. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    12,685
    53
    331
    Jan 11, 2007
    PA
    We are in NE PA and do not insulate our coops at all. Any gaps in the wood are filled with that expansion foam (only if they are high enough that chickens can't get to it). Other are caulked to keep out unwanted drafts and water.

    For summers, we have vent and windows to open and for winter, close them up. It works well for us. If you get them in spring and they have sufficient time to acclimate to the changing weather conditions, they typically do very well and are pretty self sufficient in terms of staying warm (as long as they are closed up at night). On severely cold days, we also keep them in to avoid frost bite.

    Plan for optimal floor space in your coop in advance. For standards, I recommend 10 sq ft per bird for 'winter' areas. When it snows or ice storms or frigid temps, they will be stuck in there and will appreciate the space. You will also want to plan ahead about frozen water and such. We use water heaters so we don't have to deal with them freezing. But that requires electric. Just some things to think about. Good luck to you.

    Jody
     
  3. HenHappy

    HenHappy Chillin' With My Peeps

    809
    5
    161
    Feb 16, 2007
    on my way to you....
    I have to insulate. I use the fiberglass stuff, but I have covered it with plexiglass all around the bottom and wood higher up. They have a window we just put in, with a gasket all around it. I used styrafoam at first and the girls pecked it like crazy!!! That is when I figured I'd have to cover the whole thing, so they can't reach it. They WILL eat it that is for sure. Here is my coop from the outside
    [​IMG]
    When we renovated last spring
    [​IMG]
    This is the roof
    [​IMG]
    See...all covered up. There is the same on the other side.
    [​IMG]
    Sorry for all the pics, but I wanted to demenstrate. Hope this helps.
     
  4. lilshadow

    lilshadow Chillin' With My Peeps

    893
    1
    161
    Jan 8, 2008
    Milaca, MN
    We live in an area that gets very very cold. Just this past week it was down to -40 with wind chill. My dh insulated and sheet rocked my coop. Here is mine outside and in.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. HenHappy

    HenHappy Chillin' With My Peeps

    809
    5
    161
    Feb 16, 2007
    on my way to you....
    Did you use drywall inside?

    P.S. I like it!![​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2008
  6. lilshadow

    lilshadow Chillin' With My Peeps

    893
    1
    161
    Jan 8, 2008
    Milaca, MN
    Quote:Yep sure did. I made it just like a regular house for them. I was afraid they would freeze to death.
     
  7. Are those old drawers used for nesting boxes? I like the pen idea...I think I might steal it!
     
  8. Picco

    Picco Chillin' With My Peeps

    786
    13
    181
    Mar 14, 2007
    NY
    I too live in upstate NY (zone 4 so it gets really cold) and don't have any insulation. Just plywood over a 2x4 frame. I made sure not to have any gaps in the walls where air could get in but I have a gap near the roof for ventilation and I coverered the windows with clear plastic to minimize drafts. The most important thing you can have for warmth is a south facing window. I have never had any cold related problems other than a little bit of frostbite on my penedesenca roosters' combs ( but they are HUGE).
     
  9. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

    11,744
    16
    321
    Apr 6, 2007
    Iceland
    Quote:Yep sure did. I made it just like a regular house for them. I was afraid they would freeze to death.

    Make sure you paint that drywall with a latex bathroom paint. Drywall retains
    moisture and could get very moldy. The paint will seal it up nice.
     
  10. lilshadow

    lilshadow Chillin' With My Peeps

    893
    1
    161
    Jan 8, 2008
    Milaca, MN
    Quote:They are drawers. I have a friend that works for a cabinet place, and they throw all of there mistake drawers away, and she gets them for me.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by