1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Coop rough draft

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by FoxRiverRat, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. FoxRiverRat

    FoxRiverRat Out Of The Brooder

    37
    2
    41
    Feb 5, 2016
    I'm working on a 4x6 coop for 6 hens, here's a rough drawing. were going to prefab it in sections at my work where i'll have access to all kinds of machinery/tools. This drawing doesn't show a lot of details, but there will be a nesting box added to one of the 4' sides, the 1'x1' chicken door on the opposite 4', a big clean out door on a 6' side and a window and some vents.

    Before we start cutting wood, can you guys spot any inherent flaws in our design? Thanks![​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

    6,623
    892
    333
    Sep 13, 2011
    It's good to get feedback before construction, and here's mine. It's too small. Build based on the 4' x8' dimensions of plywood, more efficient use of materials. Is it meant to be movable? If not, build it on the ground with a dig- proof foundation instead. Ventilation and predator proofing are MOST important. The triangular top ends of the building should be hardware cloth, and as many hardware cloth covered windows as possible. Walk-in coops are always better! Many of us use a garden type shed as a base, and modify it. In warmer climates, a three sided shed works great. My coop has evolved over time (getting bigger!) but starting bigger is a good idea. Mary
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Gridguru

    Gridguru Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    24
    53
    Jan 30, 2016
    Dallas, TX area.
    Boy, I wish I had an app like that when I did mine!

    A couple of suggestions. It doesn't show it, but I assume there are floor joists going across the bottom frame. You'll need that if you ever plan on standing in there, which you will during construction.

    Also, I would highly suggest horizontal top plates on the sides. The siding material wont be strong enough on it's own to support the weight over time. Those three boards will want to start growing apart with the weight of the roof being supported on them. The top plate will help. Also, I would actually suggest a second level of top plate on top of those to really secure the four walls to each other.
     
  4. FoxRiverRat

    FoxRiverRat Out Of The Brooder

    37
    2
    41
    Feb 5, 2016
    Hi Mary,

    I did actually want it to be movable. there is a code that I'm not supposed to build anything within 10 feet of my property line. yet, I see sheds and the like all over my neighborhood within 10 feet of property line. so, I'm putting the coop along the property line haha. But I do want to have the option to move it if the village/county etc tell me I need to.

    will definitely be adding windows and ventiliation and hardware cloth to all openings, thanks! I couldn't see your coop though....



    Gridguru, It's a 3D modeling software an engineer at my company uses...fringe benefits of working here! there is framing below the floor board, and you're exactly right, the engineer did say I would need to stand inside it to work on parts of it.

    What did you mean by "top plates" though? I got a bit lost there....
     
  5. Gridguru

    Gridguru Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    24
    53
    Jan 30, 2016
    Dallas, TX area.
    So the framing of each wall typically includes a bottom plate (horizontal 2x4), studs (vertical 2x4s) and a top plate (horizontal 2x4), basically making a framed wall that can be set into place a it's own unit. I have a thread down just a few that shows the construction of my coup. One of the pics have all four walls together so you can see what I mean. They are not attached to each other in the pic, only set up together. Once all the walls are up and in place, another row of top plates will span three walls to secure them together.

    Basically, if your end walls are 4ft long, and your side walls are 6ft long, you'll have a top plate that is 4ft-7in long (4ft plus the width of two 2x4s...which are 3.5" each). This will attach the corner of each side wall to the end walls and each other.

    Sorry, this is hard to explain without pictures. Let me see what I can find.
     
  6. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

    6,623
    892
    333
    Sep 13, 2011
    My coop, built on an old concrete foundation. It's not stained yet in the pictures, taken shortly after this summer's addition. For winter I wrapped the bottom six feet in plastic to block the wind. Mary[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] Not everyone has three different shingle types, but it is only a chicken coop!
     
  7. Gridguru

    Gridguru Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    24
    53
    Jan 30, 2016
    Dallas, TX area.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Do these help?
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. FoxRiverRat

    FoxRiverRat Out Of The Brooder

    37
    2
    41
    Feb 5, 2016
    oh I gotcha, a 2nd 2 x 4 along the top basically?

    nice coop Mary!
     
  9. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

    6,623
    892
    333
    Sep 13, 2011
    We have two large movable livestock sheds here, so I've got some experience with them. The skids should be VERY LARGE and running the long way under the building. Also, there will be racking forces in play, so a diagonal brace across the rafters is necessary. Also, on two occasions a whole shed blew over on it's roof in a high winds! Nobody was in or behind the shed when it happened, but deaths would have occurred . Anchoring it to the ground will be safer. Mary
     
  10. majortaylor

    majortaylor Out Of The Brooder

    57
    4
    41
    Aug 23, 2015
    Texas
    I think having it raised off the ground is great, especially if you don't have a concrete slab to set it on. Small rodents and bugs always found their way into ours until we raised it, and the birds naturally liked the height, in fact the higher the better if they had their wish! Also, being able to move it is good for changing the orientation based on where the sun is for max warmth in winter or shade in summer. And if you don't get it right at first, it's ok! We also orientate ours so that the wind doesn't go right into the coop and they have shelter from it.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by