Coop Square Footage

K_EP-I

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2019
32
44
36
Dover, Delaware
Hey there!
I am hoping to get chicks this spring and I have a 6x3 coop that is “two stories.” Would that mean my chicken coop is 36 square feet instead of 18? Or does it not work like that haha. I plan on getting enough for them to fit comfortably with 4 square feet each.
Thanks!
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Jul 23, 2018
14,731
111,012
1,542
Apalachin, NY
My Coop
My Coop
Hey there!
I am hoping to get chicks this spring and I have a 6x3 coop that is “two stories.” Would that mean my chicken coop is 36 square feet instead of 18? Or does it not work like that haha. I plan on getting enough for them to fit comfortably with 4 square feet each.
Thanks!
Is the bottom the "run" and the top enclosed? Can you post pictures?
I'm thinking it's 18 but will reserve my final answer until I see it!
 

K_EP-I

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2019
32
44
36
Dover, Delaware
Is the bottom the "run" and the top enclosed? Can you post pictures?
I'm thinking it's 18 but will reserve my final answer until I see it!
The whole this is enclosed but the bottom is kind of like a “run.” I’ll try and figure out how to upload pictures. I’m still updating it but I’ll post what I have!
 

Ridgerunner

Free Ranging
11 Years
Feb 2, 2009
24,575
13,113
707
Southeast Louisiana
I'm not a great believer in a square feet per bird in the coop and square feet per bird in the run. We keep them in so many different conditions how can one number suit everyone? Not all coops and runs follow the classical definitions. You can follow the link in my signature below to see what I base that on. Instead of talking about coop space versus run space I tend to think more in terms of how much total room is available when they need it. Quality of that space can make a difference too. Cluttered areas that break line-of-sight are better than open areas.

Your climate can be a big factor in this. It really helps us if we have a general location so we can get an idea of what you are going to face, mainly in winter. If you modify your profile to show that it is always available.

Still, when you're starting you need some guidelines. For a flock of all hens that are the same age the 4 in the coop and 10 in the run aren't bad, depending on a few things. But if you have a mixed age flock, try to integrate, or allow a broody hen to hatch and raise chicks with the flock it can be really cramped. If something like a blizzard keeps them in the coop section only for days at a time the coop section needs to be bigger.

Photos can really help. Also a bit about your climate or area and breed and sex of the chickens you are thinking about could help.

Your device, browser , operating system, and where they are stored can make a difference in how to upload photos. With mine I have a tab in the bottom left of the editing box that says "Attach files". Click on that and go to where your photo is stored. Select the photo and then insert it. My photos are stored on my desktop.

This is another case where more information can help. If you can tell us your device, operating system, browser, and where they are stored maybe someone can give you more helpful advice.
 

K_EP-I

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2019
32
44
36
Dover, Delaware
I'm not a great believer in a square feet per bird in the coop and square feet per bird in the run. We keep them in so many different conditions how can one number suit everyone? Not all coops and runs follow the classical definitions. You can follow the link in my signature below to see what I base that on. Instead of talking about coop space versus run space I tend to think more in terms of how much total room is available when they need it. Quality of that space can make a difference too. Cluttered areas that break line-of-sight are better than open areas.

Your climate can be a big factor in this. It really helps us if we have a general location so we can get an idea of what you are going to face, mainly in winter. If you modify your profile to show that it is always available.

Still, when you're starting you need some guidelines. For a flock of all hens that are the same age the 4 in the coop and 10 in the run aren't bad, depending on a few things. But if you have a mixed age flock, try to integrate, or allow a broody hen to hatch and raise chicks with the flock it can be really cramped. If something like a blizzard keeps them in the coop section only for days at a time the coop section needs to be bigger.

Photos can really help. Also a bit about your climate or area and breed and sex of the chickens you are thinking about could help.

Your device, browser , operating system, and where they are stored can make a difference in how to upload photos. With mine I have a tab in the bottom left of the editing box that says "Attach files". Click on that and go to where your photo is stored. Select the photo and then insert it. My photos are stored on my desktop.

This is another case where more information can help. If you can tell us your device, operating system, browser, and where they are stored maybe someone can give you more helpful advice.
Ok so I finally got some good pictures. Though I didn’t take the inside picture but I can do that if needed ! I still have to add vents or “windows” for them.

I live in Delaware so I get all the seasons. When it’s summer it’s hot, when it’s winter it’s cold (though we didn’t get snow this year but a LOT of rain). We don’t get anything else besides rain or snow. Though we do get the occasional hurricane which would have them cooped up but that’s about it. They are usually let out almost everyday to free range so they don’t really use their coop or run, just at night.

I don’t think I’ll have broody hens since we can’t have roosters here but I will integrate new birds this spring so I was thinking of expanding the run a bit more. The wood is there temporarily cause I have been walking in and it’s easier for me to walk on wood than dirt with boots haha

Sorry I didn’t add the information beforehand!
 

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Ridgerunner

Free Ranging
11 Years
Feb 2, 2009
24,575
13,113
707
Southeast Louisiana
I see a 3' x 6' building with two levels. I don't see how they get from one level to the other. The nests are up very high, I don't see how the roosts can be higher than the nests. That might or might not be an issue.

I do not see anything else. Do you have some area fenced in? That area under the nests next to the fence looks like a really protected area if they can get to it in bad weather.

" usually let out almost everyday to free range "

That does not mean always. That's not as beneficial as you might think in extreme conditions.

Unless you have something I don't see I'd want no more than say four in there. Five might be possible but that's tight. That's assuming they can get from one level to another in all weather and maybe to that area under the nests. On a pure square footage basis it's not great but I think the quality is pretty high.

Your problems will not come on a "normal" day, it will be in the extremes.
 

K_EP-I

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2019
32
44
36
Dover, Delaware
I see a 3' x 6' building with two levels. I don't see how they get from one level to the other. The nests are up very high, I don't see how the roosts can be higher than the nests. That might or might not be an issue.

I do not see anything else. Do you have some area fenced in? That area under the nests next to the fence looks like a really protected area if they can get to it in bad weather.

" usually let out almost everyday to free range "

That does not mean always. That's not as beneficial as you might think in extreme conditions.

Unless you have something I don't see I'd want no more than say four in there. Five might be possible but that's tight. That's assuming they can get from one level to another in all weather and maybe to that area under the nests. On a pure square footage basis it's not great but I think the quality is pretty high.

Your problems will not come on a "normal" day, it will be in the extremes.
To get up to the upper floor they have a ramp. The bottom half is like a run and the top half is where the roost is. Where the nest is, was a hole to be able to check and refill their food and water when they were chicks so I added the nest there but when I took a step back to look at it, it did seem a bit to high but they still use it. I could show you a picture of the inside of needed?

Also, thank you for your advice! I’m new to making my own things and got some ideas off the internet and then added some of my own. I am updating as I get new information.
 

K_EP-I

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2019
32
44
36
Dover, Delaware
Here are some pictures of the inside. Since I lowered the floor I just realized that the ramp now is probably a bit tight to get up so I am going to have to fix the ramp up. I also am going to get more bedding probably today.

The 1st picture is the bottom
The 2nd is the top half. (The wall comes off only on the top half)
The 3rd is how they get up.
 

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rosemarythyme

Free Ranging
Jul 3, 2016
7,183
13,975
642
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
My Coop
Here are some pictures of the inside.
How long is your roost bar? 6' I assume? That's the answer to how many birds maximum you can fit in there (1' per bird). That doesn't mean you should put 6 in there, but if they all get along, it might work.

Also I don't see any ventilation in the photos (might be some under roof that I can't see?) More birds you put in a space, the more they'll need ventilation.
 
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