1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

coop substrate

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by plreef, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. plreef

    plreef Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    0
    129
    Jan 7, 2009
    Eastern CT
    What do you guy/gals use as a substrate in your coops? Currntly I'm useing pine shavings. My friend works for a tree service Co. and he can get me all the wood chips I want. Does anyone use them?
     
  2. B. Saffles Farms

    B. Saffles Farms Mr. Yappy Chickenizer

    Nov 23, 2008
    Madisonville, TN
    I use pine shavings too.
     
  3. crazychicken

    crazychicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 11, 2008
    NC
    i use pine or cedar shavings whatever is available and cheapest since my parents pay for it [​IMG]
     
  4. Must Be Losing It

    Must Be Losing It Lost It

    993
    1
    161
    Mar 3, 2008
    Uxbridge MA
    Would the shavings you get from your friend be dried? If not, that could be a problem.
     
  5. plreef

    plreef Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    0
    129
    Jan 7, 2009
    Eastern CT
    No their fresh cut chips. Too much moisture hu. I didnt think about that.
     
  6. callen0912

    callen0912 Chillin' With My Peeps

    159
    9
    61
    Jan 31, 2015
    Just so you know you shouldn't use pine shavings as they are harmful to birds respiratory systems.
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    19,945
    3,104
    476
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Not pine shavings, cedar shavings. Pine and aspen shavings are fine and are used by a whole lot of people.

    Cedar shavings give off fumes that can harm chickens respiratory systems if it is concentrated enough. Cedar wood is often used in furniture used to store clothing because it keeps insects out that might otherwise eat the clothing. Cedar wood is OK to build coops if you have good ventilation, but cedar shavings have a whole lot more surface area so they give off a lot more shavings. How big a risk they pose depends a little bit on how fresh they are (though they give off fumes for a long time) and how well they are ventilated. Since they pose a risk I consider good practice and a reasonable precaution to not use cedar shavings.

    I would not use cedar wood to build a nest either, especially if it is an enclosed nest.

    Birds’ respiratory systems are more sensitive than human’s systems. That’s why miners take canaries underground with them. If the bird dies the air is bad and it is time to get out.
     
  8. callen0912

    callen0912 Chillin' With My Peeps

    159
    9
    61
    Jan 31, 2015
    thanks for the correction! I meant to write cedar. Not sure why I didn't!
     
  9. PapaChaz

    PapaChaz Overrun With Chickens

    2,833
    618
    301
    May 25, 2010
    NW Georgia
    yeah I was gonna say not to use cedar instead of pine, but see that RR already fixed it for ya :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2015
  10. PapaChaz

    PapaChaz Overrun With Chickens

    2,833
    618
    301
    May 25, 2010
    NW Georgia
    it always amazes me on a forum/message board there are some people who never search for thier topic and just start a new thread, and then there are people who search and read everything (which is good) but respond to threads that are years old, LOL GUILTY!!!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by