Copper Morans wanted!

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by solarjack, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. solarjack

    solarjack New Egg

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    Hello everyone!
    We have been reading Backyard Chickens for some time and had not realized that we hadn't joined. Now corrected!

    We hope to find a source for up to six copper moran hens and a rooster -- hopefully somewhere in the Bay Area - but perhaps can be safely shipped from anywhere. (We realize it is possible to buy copper moran chicks from a commercial vendor but hesitate to undertake the long process of protecting them until of egg-laying age.)

    Mature hens seem to be very expensive. Nevertheless we hope some of the other BackYard Chicken reader/members can steer us to the best way to replace our flock and try again. We miss not only the having a source for such great eggs - but the beautiful birds themselves!.

    We have repeatedly replaced our copper moran flock as our local bobcat has outwitted what we have thought were increasingly varmit-tight coops and pens. At the moment we are chickenless - but we think the cages are now safe and are determined to try again.

    (This last depredation ended when we used as bait in a live animal trap one of the few hen bodies left. We caught the bobcat when she came back to get her last victim. .(Fish and Game rules are to kill a caught bobcat immediately or let it go. No relocation permitted.) We put (we presume her) back in the cage and let her go - she immediately escaped through the hole through which she had entered! So at least now we know of one area to reinforce.
    Earlier we had tried posting wolf urine patches around. They may have worked for awhile - but needed to be replaced.)

    We do have a very secure coop - but can't bring ourselves to keep our chicken friends cooped up all the time. So we let them out into a yard/range area - screened on all sides. It is hard to be sure every night that they are all inside - and then let them out in the morning. Maybe the only hope is to post a 24-hour armed guard.

    Suggestions welcome!
     
  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Short of surrounding your coop and run with electrified fencing, I don't see how you are going to stop the predators. Letting that one go has assured that it will be trap shy from now on, and you won't get another chance to eliminate it.

    Are your chickens more precious than a predator?? Is it more important to let them free range, or be alive and happy inside a Ft. Knox of a coop and covered run? If, you cannot dispose(kill)of a predator there is no reason to bait traps.

    As you say, (black)copper Marans hens are expensive - it's worth the investment to augment security features. Game cams at coop and run, so you can see who/what/where is taking your birds. Strong roof cover on the run, so no hawk dropins, no bobcat or raccoons jumping down from a tree. It will also protect somewhat from rain & snow & provide some shade. Get 1/2" hardware cloth to replace ALL chicken or poultry wire. , and hardware cloth backing any windows so you can open them in nice weather without letting trouble inside. Some people put baby monitors inside the coop - so they can hear if the birds are getting panicked by something.

    If you go to the predator threads you can get more information on keeping them away, and get proper advice for eliminating different species. A fantastic livestock protection dog would lower your losses but, a really good one takes a long time to train and predators mainly come after dusk, when dogs are usually sleeping.

    You have repeatedly replaced your birds, that bobcat owes you a pile of money. Maybe a neighbor would dispose of one for you and keep the pelt. When one predator dies more will take it's place. But you will know for certain it is not the same old bobcat.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

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    Hello there and welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    You might take a look in your state thread and do some chatting with your chicken neighbors. Maybe someone nearby raises this breed. Scroll through this link to find your state thread...https://www.backyardchickens.com/f/26/where-am-i-where-are-you

    If you give them enough room in a run, they can be quite content. I can't free range unless I supervise them all the time due to all the predators in the area. So I let them out for an hour or so a day as I am working around the yard or cleaning the coop. They get their free ranging fix and everybody stays alive. Make sure to build your coop and run like fort knox to keep the predators out and your birds should be pretty happy. Make sure they have at least 10 square foot per bird in the run or more if you can afford it.

    Good luck with your flock and we do welcome you to our flock!
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]We're glad to have you.

    Drumstick Diva and Two Crows have given you some good advice already.
     
  5. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] Glad you joined us!

    Good luck with finding the birds you want! I'm sorry about the bobcat attacks.
     
  6. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Hello :frow and Welcome To BYC!
     
  7. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member Project Manager

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.
     

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