Corid and Medicated Chick Feed?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Farmgirl1878, Jul 14, 2019.

  1. Farmgirl1878

    Farmgirl1878 Songster

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    I've got a few year-old hens (and possibly the roo) who are passing bloody poops, are a little bit off their feed, and have had pale combs and wattles for a week or so. The bloody poop started two days ago, so I started everyone on Corid yesterday.

    It's been extremely hot and humid here and the flock is in an uproar establishing the new pecking order as the chicks grow up. No changes with chow, water, or recess (they get to free range while I'm out with them a few times a day. My set up is all sand and I keep it very clean and dry, but we did have a nest of wrens inside the coop last month. (I couldn't reach them to get them out.)

    My question is, do I need to stop feeding the medicated chick starter? I've got six seven-week old chicklets that were broody raised, so everyone in the flock is eating the medicated baby chow. I'm only putting one teaspoon of Corid per gallon of water, so it's not the full dose for a bad infestation.

    I have my fecal float test ready to send in, but am pretty sure they've got coccidiosis. Here are some poop pics if anyone is interested.

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  2. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    Stop the medicated chick crumble and put the flock on unmedicated chick crumble.
    They should be on the severe outbreak dose for 5-7 days then drop to half that concentration for another 5 day. No other water source during that time and no nutritional supplements that contain thiamine.
    With that much blood, I would consider directly drenching the flock for 2 days in addition to the Corid water. The dose to directly drench is 0.1 mls/pound of liquid Corid (9.6%).
    Amprolium is extremely well tolerated by chickens.
     
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  3. Farmgirl1878

    Farmgirl1878 Songster

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    Thanks! I've got layer crumble and pellets, so I'll put everyone on that until we're done with the treatments. They've had the layer feed mixed in with the chick feed, so shouldn't even notice.
     
  4. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    I realize there is a lot of contention on this subject but I would not feed chicks layer feed. If you have chicks, pullets, roosters or molting hens, none of them should be eating all that extra calcium. I would just finish up whatever layer feed you have and switch the entire flock over to All Flock, Flock Raiser or even just chick crumbles... anything with about 18 - 20% protein as a complete diet. Keep a container of oyster shell near the feeder(s) for the active layers and you should be all set.
     
  5. Farmgirl1878

    Farmgirl1878 Songster

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    Good to know. The feed I do have is Nutrena All Flock and it has 18% protein (I meant to say all flock, just mis-typed!). Some of the girls are starting their first molt, so maybe a feed with higher protein? Or supplement with scrambled eggs? And they always have oyster shells available.
     
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  6. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    I like Purina Flock Raiser because it has 20% protein. I feed that protein level year round and have never had an issue with feather picking or brittle feathers. They are all in good plumage with exception of my roosters favorites. They have a bit of wear.
     
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  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    There is no need to change the feed while treating with amprollium (Corid.) The concentration of amprol in the feed is small, and would not overdose them. With as much blood as you are seeing in those droppjngs, I would increase the dosage to 2 tsp of the liquid Corid or 1 1/2 tsp of the powder per gallon of water. Treat for a full 7 days as well. After they are eating well for a week or two, I would then dose them with SafeGuard Liquid Goat Wormer 1/4 ml per pound for 5 days to treat for any serious worms that they may have. Alternatively, you could have some droppings checked for worms by a vet or with an online test kit. I agree to stop any layer feed until all chicks are laying. Excess calcium for non-layers can cause gout or kidney problems.
     
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  8. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    I agree on increase the Corid to the full dose.
     
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  9. Farmgirl1878

    Farmgirl1878 Songster

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    Going out to change the water right now, so will up the dose. Do I need to add any Nutridrench now, or wait 'til next weekend?
     
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  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    No B vitamins (which includes ND) during Corid treatment, and do not mix anything in the Corid water.
     
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