Corid/coccidosis preventative questions

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Zanna, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. Zanna

    Zanna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 14, 2010
    Jefferson, Oregon
    I am thoroughly confused after reading all the previous and current posts I can find on this subject............ I have 8 new BCM chicks that are 4 weeks old. All are healthy and almost fully feathered. They are in my brooder for their month long quarantine and then I plan to put them in a large dog kennel in my main coop for about 2 weeks which houses about 70 other various aged pullets/hens and 2 roos, then incorporate them in to the flock. I have had a lot of losses of young chickens the past couple of months, I am suspect of coccidosis but do not know that was the problem for certain. I would like to do a preventative on these chicks if the general concensus recommends that. I am currently feeding fryer feed (higher protein) as the chicks are in a very clean dry enviroment. I picked up some corid today and my initial plan was to begin them on 1 tsp/gallon of water one week before moving them outside, continue that for two more weeks when they go out into the kennel and incorporate the other chickens poop into the dog kennel gradually at that time so that they will build up immunity. There are so many different ideas of medicated chick feed, use of corid, etc and I am thoroughly confused........... Any thoughts would be appreciated!
     
  2. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2009
    SouthEast Texas
    One thing i think we all agree on (i think). Using Corid as a preventative will only work if they are exposed to the cocci organisms while receiving the medication. It's not a vaccine (i know you know that); it's just something to prevent the organisms from populating in the intestine to the point of overwhelming the chick, but they need to be present in order to allow the chick to start developing immunity. They can't develop immunity without it.

    All that said, let me tell you what i would probably do in your situation. In my opinion, and based on my personal experience, four week is a little old to start with naturally developing immunity. To be consistently successful, this should start the first week of life. But since it's the colder part of the year, you may have a good chance.

    I would start now, putting a small amount (say a half of a spade full) of soil and adult droppings in the brooder each day. Mark your calendar for the first day you start doing this. Do it every day, and at about the two week mark, start watching those babies like a hawk. At the first sign of "fluffed-up-ness," general lethargy, or bloody poop, medicate all the chicks in the brooder with the Corid, two teaspoons per gallon.

    Corid does a great job of kicking cocci outbreaks in the toosh, and if you catch it right away, it should knock it out before anyone gets too sick.

    And they may not get sick at all. If you don't see any signs of cocci by about week six, i would stop worrying about it. [​IMG] Honestly, i would probably stop worrying about it at week four.

    That's what i would do.

    If you feel like reading even more that you already have, there are a couple of links in my sig line with even more blathering on about coccidiosis. I hope this helps.
     
  3. Zanna

    Zanna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 14, 2010
    Jefferson, Oregon
    I am going to get started with your plan in the morning! I also read your other information and I agree wholeheartedly!! I have never fed medicated feed, I feed a fryer ration to the young ones which has no meds in it and the idea of only treating if they come down with it makes complete sense to me. Thanks so much for responding!
     
  4. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am very happy to help. I hope all goes well. [​IMG]
     

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