Corid for Goslings?

mandamay28

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Apr 20, 2016
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Should I give a preventative dose of corid to my 2 week old goslings? I've strted taking them outside and I don't want them to get sick. I always give a prevetative dose to my chicks when they start going outside... just not sure about goslings. If so, what is the dosage? TIA
 

EggSighted4Life

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Apr 9, 2016
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Hi. :frow

Water fowl don't seem to have as much issue with cocci as chickens do.

No, I personally would not use Corid unless I had a reason. And going outside isn't a reason... in most circumstances. I definitely would treat without confirmation from a more experienced waterfowl person... though I don't THINK it will hurt them... @casportpony any wisdom to share here? @chickens really any tips here? TIA!

Instead of using Corid for chicks... I bring in a plug of dirt from the pasture so the chicks can build some immunity before going out full time with no exposure. Please note cocci is in EVERY single chicken poo... and is often a bigger problem in the brooder. Only once in 9 years have I had to treat chicks after sending to pasture... and that was the first time when I didn't know about bringing in some dirt or keeping initial trips outdoors limited to short periods instead of full time exposure instantly... and our first year in this house when they guy before us had untold numbers of fowl.

Also, for informational purposes... Corid works by blocking thiamine so starve out and SLOW the growth of cocci while the birds build their own immunity.

Good luck! :pop
 

casportpony

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Should I give a preventative dose of corid to my 2 week old goslings? I've strted taking them outside and I don't want them to get sick. I always give a prevetative dose to my chicks when they start going outside... just not sure about goslings. If so, what is the dosage? TIA
You do not need to give them any Corid. :D

Here is some info on coccidiosis in Geese:
COCCIDIOSIS

Geese can get two distinct types of coccidiosis. The most prevalent form is renal coccidiosis caused by Eimeria truncata. While intestinal coccidiosis is less prevalent, it is caused primarily by Eimeria anseris. At least five additional species of Eimeria have been isolated from the intestine of the goose. The level of infection and degree of economic loss associated with coccidiosis in the goose is generally low and it is not regarded as a major problem.

Symptoms. Renal coccidiosis can affect geese from 3-12 weeks of age, although the younger birds are much more susceptible. In an exceptional acute form, renal coccidiosis can result in mortality as high as 80 percent. Other indicators of the disease include depression, weakness, diarrhoea, whiteish faeces, anorexia, dull, sunken eyes and drooped wings. Diagnosis of renal coccidiosis can be confirmed by locating the distinctive oocysts in the kidneys and in the cloaca near the urethras. Birds quickly develop immunity to re-infection by Eimeria truncata.

Intestinal coccidiosis also mostly affects young birds but does not always result in mortality. Rather, the infection produces anorexia, a tottering gait, debility, diarrhoea and morbidity. The small intestine becomes enlarged and filled with reddish brown fluid. Lesions are primarily in the middle and lower portion of the small intestine.

Treatment. Various sulphonamide drugs and coccidiostats have been used in the treatment of renal and intestinal coccidiosis of geese. If the geese are to be fed rations which were formulated for other types of poultry, it should be noted that in spite of popular belief to the contrary, waterfowl can be fed rations containing most of the coccidiostats used for chickens. The Veterinary University of Hanover, Germany have specifically reported that the following coccidiostats found in chicken rations are tolerated by waterfowl: amprolium, amprolium-ethopabate, clopidol, clopidol-methylbenzoquate, DOT (zoalene), lasalocid monensin-sodium, narasin, nicarbazin, robenidin, salinomycin and sulfaquinoxaline. They also reported that neither halofuginone nor arprinocid are tolerated by waterfowl and that they could find no information on the effect of giving waterfowl feed containing either decoquinate or maduramicin ammonium.
 
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Pyxis

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Goslings generally are pretty safe from getting coccidiosis. It can happen, as the info from casportpony says, but it's not nearly as common as it is with chickens. So, you don't need to give a preventative dose. It's good that you have the Corid on hand in case they do develop it, since it can happen, but it's not likely :)

And no, Corid wouldn't hurt them if you did give it since amprolium is safe for waterfowl.
 

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