Corid in California?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by CBinSantaCruz, Nov 2, 2013.

  1. CBinSantaCruz

    CBinSantaCruz Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 19, 2013
    Santa Cruz, Ca.
    Hello,
    I have 4, one month old chicks and last night I noticed one or more of them have blood in their stool. I read trough the poop pics and it sure looks like they have cocci. Corid is not available at my local feed and seed and the guy there said it would require a prescription in California. Is that true? Looks like I can order it on-line so not sure why I would need a prescription.
    Anyway soon as I can get some via mail would be Tuesday. I also have some adult birds about 9 months old. The chicks have been in quarantine so I do not think cocci spread to my adult birds but is there any harm in treating them anyway?
    Is there a BYC page you can link me to that has all I need to know about cocci and its treatment?
    Thanks!
     
  2. CBinSantaCruz

    CBinSantaCruz Out Of The Brooder

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  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    No, Corid does not require a prescription in CA. These crazy feed store people, good grief! I get mine at Tractor Supply. Shop or call around, I would not wait until Tues to start treatment. And no, it will do no harm to any birds who do not have an overgrowth of the cocci.

    Edited to add more info about cocci:

    Cocci are a protozoa that live in the soil. When it is consumed by a chicken that has not had time to develop immunity it invades the intestines and quickly multiplies, causing damage, bleeding and a quick death. Symptoms are lethargy, not wanting to eat/drink, though sometimes the damage caused by the cocci in later stages causes enough dehydration that the birds then want to drink a lot. Sometimes there will be visible blood in the stool, sometimes not. Most adult chickens do have a few of them in their gut but they do develop immunity to the strains that are in their environment. A move to new property or bringing in new birds can expose them to new strains to which they are not immune so care must be taken in those situations.

    Coccidiosis is easy to treat provided it is caught and treated early. The longer it goes on the more damage to the birds intestines and the less chance for survival. Corid (or any brand of Amprolium) works by depriving the cocci of needed thiamin, thus vastly slowing the growth. It does not kill it all off. This gives the birds time to develop their own immunity. Older birds can that have a lowered immunity for some reason can also come down with coccidiosis.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
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  5. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    I live in California and NO corid does NOT need a prescription I got mine off line for heavens sake. Try tractor supply.
     
  6. CBinSantaCruz

    CBinSantaCruz Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 19, 2013
    Santa Cruz, Ca.
    Great thanks everyone. I found some a few towns away in powder form so I will be taking a road trip. Thanks again.
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
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  8. CBinSantaCruz

    CBinSantaCruz Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 19, 2013
    Santa Cruz, Ca.
    Thanks again everyone. Can you check my math?
    I have 4 cups of water and need to add 2.25 cc/ml of Corid = 16 cups of water and 9.5cc/ml of Corid?
    2.25 cc/ml = Appox 1/2 teaspoon?


    Cheers!
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    2.4 ml per quart or 32 ounces to be exact. It's easier to say 10 ml or 2 tsp per gallon and divide by 4 equals 2.5 ml.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
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  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    The exact amount of 9.6% liquid Corid or Amprol to use is 9.5ml per gallon, but I just round up to 10ml per gallon, the math is easier, lol. So that's 10ml per 128 ounces.

    128 ounces divided by 10ml = .078125ml per ounce
    .078125ml * 4 ounces (1/2 cup) = .3124ml per 1/2 cup
    .078125ml * 8 ounces (1 cup)= .625ml per cup
    .078125ml * 16 ounces (2 cups) = 1.25ml per pint
    .078125ml * 32 ounces (4 cups) = 2.5ml per quart
    .078125ml * 64 ounces (8 cups) = 5ml per 1/2 gallon
    .078125ml * 128 ounces (16 cups) = 10ml per gallon
    4.75ml per 1/2 gallon (64 ounces)


    Based on 9.5ml per gallon (128 ounces) it's:
    2.375ml per quart (32 ounces)
    1.1875ml per pint (16 ounces)
    .59375ml per cup (8 ounces)
    .296875ml per 1/2 cup (4 ounces)
    .07421875ml per ounce


    1/4 teaspoon = 1.23223 ml
    1/3 teaspoon = 1.64297ml
    1/2 teaspoon = 2.46446 ml
    1 teaspoon = 4.92892 ml
    2 teaspoons = 9.85784 ml
    Sorry, sometimes I get carried away!
    [​IMG][​IMG] Please let me know if I made an error, lol.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013

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