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cornish x, can't stand

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Charlene, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. Charlene

    Charlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2008
    I just noticed one of my cornish corsses (6 weeks old) can't seem to stand anymore. It can kinda get up and move a few steps, but can't stay upright. Is it time to cull? I suppose this could be my practice bird. Is there such a thing as too young or too small to eat?
     
  2. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:These birds are bred to spend there whole Lifes Moving With there faces shoved in water and feed. Never even seeing that they have feet. I had a Roo Go down and I Just Moved the water and feed Closer to him and I got 5 lbs out of him. Its when you notice he wont eat or drink Then its time to preserve what meat you can. Maybe someone else has more information then I do I struggled with my Cx in the beginning But Now I got some Nice turn out birds [​IMG]
     
  3. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    You have your practise bird . I tried dry plucking one that went down at 9 + weeks [ was saving her to breed ] and the skin was too tender and tore over the breast so I ended up skinning her . I'll scald the next time even if it means heating the water for only one or two . By the way , going down on her legs did not show damage to any of the thigh or leg meat and it was tender and moist inspite of being cooked on the grill without skin [ though I did drape bacon over it to baste as it cooked ] .
     
  4. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    The "problem" with CX's is that their bodies grow much faster than their internal organs. From my experience with CX's, I've learned that a bird that can't/won't stand and walk to the feeder has an internal organ problem. This year, I've had 5 birds that couldn't stand up and I've had an impromptu processing session just to prevent further misery. EVERY one of those birds had a considerable amount of fluid around their hearts, contained in the pericardium. Their internal organs just can't support the body growth that they are achieving. This is why most CX's farmers withhold feed for 12 hours and give feed for 12 hours. It slows them down a tad so less of the birds run into this situation.

    You could move the water and feed closer and get more meat, but I must pose the question....Why do you raise your own birds? Is it to reduce the suffering that birds experience in the Industrial Ag chicken industry? I just can't see keeping any living being alive any longer if they can't even walk. You choose whatever is important to you but please consider what this poor bird is experiencing.

    At 6 weeks old, you'll get a decent harvest. There's no need to keep that bird alive any longer. It would be a great practice bird to ease you into the processing tasks.

    Dan
     
  5. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:Hmm Good Point Dan never saw it that way my eye was more on the dollar thanks.
     
  6. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    Quote:Dollars can be important too. It all depends on your motivation for raising your own meaties. Are you doing it to save money or are you doing it for another reason altogether. I don't mean to sound judgmental at all. It boils down to what you, personally, value more. The answer to this will vary from person to person. I'm just trying to get the OP to answer this question in an honest fashion. That will lead them to the proper decision.

    Dan
     
  7. Charlene

    Charlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2008
    Thanks, Dan. You are right. In my case I am trying to do something better for the chickens than factory farm raise them. So, this will be my practice chicken. Oh boy, fingers crossed.....
     
  8. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    Charlene,
    You'll be just fine, I know you will. Read through the posts about how to process the birds and print out the instructions you're comfortable with. It seems the largest discrepancy comes with the actual method of killing. That being decapitation or bleeding out. I'm a firm believer of bleeding out being more humane, but please try both ways a couple times and choose what you feel most comfortable with. Give us an update and let us know how things turn out for you.

    Dan
     
  9. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:Dollars can be important too. It all depends on your motivation for raising your own meaties. Are you doing it to save money or are you doing it for another reason altogether. I don't mean to sound judgmental at all. It boils down to what you, personally, value more. The answer to this will vary from person to person. I'm just trying to get the OP to answer this question in an honest fashion. That will lead them to the proper decision.

    Dan

    My broilers are for market Strictly, However I free range them because I don't agree with the industrys way of Drugging and hormoning So try to produce a more healthy and productive free range product. But.. As i said I never even looked at it like that. If I disagree with the way the industry treats and raises birds. Basically I would be doing the same thing Just without the walls. Seriously you Opened my eyes to something good. A Good happy chicken is a Good happy meal. thanks alot Dan again.
     
  10. Charlene

    Charlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2008
    Whew. I did it and it wasn't that bad. It was great to have a couple friends here for moral support but once the throat slicing was over (and that's so quick anyway) we just got down to business. It's in the fridge now and I hope it tastes good! 3lb 11oz all cleaned out w/o the neck etc. The guts were a little weird but not so bad. Thanks all for the advice.
     

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