Cornish

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by yoker, May 6, 2009.

  1. yoker

    yoker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2008
    What are they like?
    I saw some and they look small and light untill you lift them they are heavy!!!
     
  2. hippichick

    hippichick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2008
    Branch, La
    I just got a pair of Dark Cornish Bantams this past weekend. I totally agree, it amazes me when I pick them up. I just can't believe how heavy and solid they are. It's like they're too little to be that heavy. Sorry, though, I haven't taken any pics yet. But I'd love to see pics from others who have this breed too.

    Paula [​IMG]
     
  3. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    If it's not storming tomorrow I'll take a pic of my trio of chunky monkeys... daily they weigh more and more it astonishs me! LOL!
     
  4. Ryu

    Ryu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 6, 2009
    I have Standards, and they are an armful. They are very sweet birds. Mine always trot over to see if I have a treat for them.

    Once you've handled Cornish, it's really hard to go back to to a 'normal' chicken. Even our Buckeyes are too boney for me to enjoy holding.

    I call them Chunky Monkeys too!
     
  5. hippichick

    hippichick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2008
    Branch, La
    I've heard that there are breeding issues with these. Any input on this?

    Paula
     
  6. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    We haven't had any problems with ours breeding.

    Steve in NC
     
  7. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Claremore, OK
    Quote:Good quality ones with the nice wide stance do seem to have issues in breeding. It's because it's kind of hard to balance on top of a female while having to keep a linebacker's stance all the time. Eventually, the males may stop breeding altogether if they never get it right.

    AI is a good method to help with fertility issues.

    The problem is not usually seen in hatchery quality birds as the stance and "girth" of the birds is not as large as exhibition quality.

    ETA photos that illustrate what I'm trying to say:
    Good quality hen that shows the linebacker's stance:
    [​IMG]

    Hatchery quality flock that does not show the linebacker's stance:
    [​IMG]

    See how the legs are so much closer together in the hatchery stock?
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2009
  8. Ryu

    Ryu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have one standard roo who is too wide to tread a hen, meaning his legs aren't close enough together to get both on top. When he was about a year old he was small enough, but as he's finished growing he got really wide.

    All of my other roos can breed naturally. I think that unless you are breeding for a really extreme body type there won't be any problems.
     
  9. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    Why would you breed a bird to the point that they require AI?

    Steve in NC
     
  10. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Claremore, OK
    Because it fits the standard.

    For example, AI is used in Cochins, Orpingtons, any show bird that a breeder doesn't want messed up by being in a breeding pen...

    And then there's the "production" method. Broad Breasted White Turkeys are AIed 100%. The males are too large to successfully cover a female without injury to themselves or the hens. The males are large with some being upwards of 80 lbs. My professor claims to have seen one that was over 100 lbs., but I have never seen one of these. The 80 lbs. plus I have seen up front and I will never say something bad about a turkey again.

    (Think of Chance on Homeward Bound when he meets that "giant chicken" and swears to never eat chicken again.)
     

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