Correct humidity for incubation of Call duck eggs? (Sorry to rehash this)

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by JadeComputerGal, Oct 27, 2014.

  1. JadeComputerGal

    JadeComputerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I apologize in advance for bringing this up again since there are hundreds of posts about this on the Internet. The problem is that I feel like I'm going in circles reading them. I see recommendations that range anywhere from 30% to 70% humidity before lockdown, and most of the people who give opinions on proper humidity say they have vast experience with hatching Call ducks. They all sound like they really know what they're talking about, so I don't know whom to believe since this will be my first time using artificial incubation. (Beginning tomorrow, so I'm getting kind of anxious from feeling like I still don't know the correct answer.)

    The incubator I'll be using is a Brinsea Octagon 20 Advance EX. The eggs I'll be putting in tomorrow were ordered from an eBay seller as a kind of trial run to make sure we know what to do when our show and show breeder ducks start laying next year. If I have a low hatch rate or none at all from these eggs, I want to be able to feel sure it wasn't caused by me doing something wrong with the incubation.

    Thanks so much to anyone who can help!
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    I hope it's okay that someone who cannot exactly help does take an interest [​IMG] and I have a question for you.

    This is not to put you on the spot.

    I have read that some instructions are vague about humidity measurement. Here is a quote from an MSU publication (http://msucares.com/poultry/reproductions/poultry_environment.html):

    Frequently there is confusion as to how the measurement of humidity is expressed. Most persons in the incubator industry refer to the level of humidity in terms of degrees F., (wet-bulb) rather than percent relative humidity. The two terms are interconvertible and actual humidity depends upon the temperature (F.) as measured with a dry-bulb thermometer. Conversion between the two humidity measurements can be made using a psychrometric table.
     
  3. DuckLover1029

    DuckLover1029 Out Of The Brooder

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    i am having the same problem with this. my call eggs are at 40
     
  4. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  5. Kleonaptra

    Kleonaptra Chillin' With My Peeps

    My bator is a cheapo, it doesn't measure humidity. Last year I thought it was too dry and kept adding water, I got no ducklings and the **** thing leaked everywhere. It has overflow holes that I didn't notice! This year I just left it alone until pipping, thinking that so long as the temp was high, it only needed a small amount of water to make a lot of humidity. That turned out to be right. Once pipping started, I would add a little warm water every 6 to 12 hours, just to steam it up a bit. Of course, I only got 3 ducklings out of about 9 eggs, so its far from perfect, but its better than Ive done in other years!

    I find that exact measurements for temp or humidity are really not helpful. Ive followed instructions the last few years and it got me no where. I think trust your instincts, and think like a mother duck. She sits on them freezing cold and dripping wet, or doesn't get off all day when its hot, she certainly doesn't turn them at regular intervals...Its about creating a range that is favourable to the most eggs, I think. Every egg will want something slightly different and we are trying to create an environment favourable for all of them, which is probably impossible.

    Ive got another 13 in my bator now. I stored them for about 3 weeks so Im not sure how they'll go. Im so over the moon to have a few new ducks Im not as worried now. Whatever happens happens.
     
  6. JadeComputerGal

    JadeComputerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, always okay. I always enjoy reading your posts.

    The wet bulb vs RH thing seriously tripped me up in the beginning before I realized there are two different measurements that give you very different figures. The problem I've had since then is that the recommendations from various people span a huge range of RH, everywhere from 30% to 65% before lockdown. Right now I have the temp at 99.5 and the RH at 50%. I guess I'm going to stick with that unless I hear otherwise. Not sure what kind of luck I'm going to have anyway since 2/3 of the eggs had air cell issues. I'm going to keep my fingers crossed.

    It really surprises me that you don't incubate. I felt like I was the only one [​IMG]
     

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