Coryza in my new breeding pair. Questions

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ChelseysChicken, Dec 7, 2014.

  1. ChelseysChicken

    ChelseysChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Recently obtained a breeding pair. Was told that they had coryza until I was leaving with them and just left anyway. They were treated with baytril and seem to be feeling MUCH better. They have been secluded to their own area coop/run... Wondering I they can infect my free ranging flock and birds in pens next to them?
    Most important question since they were going to be my incubator egg makers :/ can I hatch their eggs and the chicks be coryza free?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    My goodness, you don't want coryza near your other chickens, so I would take them back or put them down. They are still carriers, and you can spread it on your clothes, shoes, and it would be a biosecurity nightmare. Coryza is a chronic disease--they are never cured, and although it doesn't spread through the hatching egg as MG does, without lab work, you can't know which they have. Here is some info on coryza:

    Infectious Coryza

    Synonyms: roup, cold, coryza
    Species affected: chickens, pheasants, and guinea fowl. Common in game chicken flocks.
    Clinical signs: Swelling around the face, foul smelling, thick, sticky discharge from the nostrils and eyes, labored breathing, and rales (rattles -- an abnormal breathing sound) are common clinical signs. The eyelids are irritated and may stick together. The birds may have diarrhea and growing birds may become stunted (see Table 1).
    Mortality from coryza is usually low, but infections can decrease egg production and increase the incidence and/or severity of other diseases. Mortality can be as high as 50 percent, but is usually no more than 20 percent. The clinical disease can last from a few days to 2-3 months, depending on the virulence of the pathogen and the existence of other infections such as mycoplasmosis.
    Transmission: Coryza is primarily transmitted by direct bird-to-bird contact. This can be from infected birds brought into the flock as well as from birds which recover from the disease which remain carriers of the organism and may shed intermittently throughout their lives.. Birds risk exposure at poultry shows, bird swaps, and live-bird sales. Inapparent infected adult birds added into a flock are a common source for outbreaks. Within a flock, inhalation of airborne respiratory droplets, and contamination of feed and/or water are common modes of spread.
    Treatment: Water soluble antibiotics or antibacterials can be used. Sulfadimethoxine (Albon[​IMG], Di-Methox[​IMG]) is the preferred treatment. If it is not available, or not effective, sulfamethazine (Sulfa-Max[​IMG], SulfaSure[​IMG]), erythromycin (gallimycin[​IMG]), or tetracycline (Aureomycin[​IMG]) can be used as alternative treatments. Sulfa drugs are not FDA approved for pullets older than 14 weeks of age or for commercial layer hens. While antibiotics can be effective in reducing clinical disease, they do not eliminate carrier birds.
    Prevention: Good management and sanitation are the best ways to avoid infectious coryza. Most outbreaks occur as a result of mixing flocks. All replacement birds on "coryza-endemic" farms should be vaccinated. The vaccine (Coryza-Vac) is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) on the back of the neck. Each chicken should be vaccinated four times, starting at 5 weeks of age with at least 4 weeks between injections. Vaccinate again at 10 months of age and twice yearly thereafter.
     
  3. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Yes, they will infect your other birds. Coryza is carried for life after the birds have it. And yes, technically you can hatch chicks from them free of coryza. Coryza does not pass down through the egg like mycoplasma does. However, the problem is keeping them free of coryza. Since it will be in your flock, you could accidentally give it to them very easily, by tracking it to their living area on your shoes, handling infected birds or their food/water items and then forgetting to wash your hands and handling the chicks or their food/water items, etc etc...honestly if I were you I'd either cull the new pair or bring them right back to the breeder and demand a refund, and then spread the word around about them that they are selling sick birds. That's just unacceptable.

    Eggcessive posted some really good information about identifying and treating it. By the way, are you positive it's coryza? Because if it's mycoplasma, whose symptoms are identical except for the terrible smell that coryza has, all chicks hatch infected.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2014
  4. ChelseysChicken

    ChelseysChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So now that I probably have a coryza flock what can I expect. Will the sickness part just come and go? How can I keep them at least somewhat healthy.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Coryza is only alive in the environment for about 3 days or less, once the chickens are gone. So I would remove those chickens, clean and disinfect facilities and equipment as well as possible, and then hope no one gets sick. Watch for signs of coughing, sneezing, noisy breathing or rattles, sticky eye or nasal drainage, or swelling of the face or around an eye. The best treatment is Sulfadimethoxine (or Di-Methox) or Sulmet, along with Tylan 50 injectable given to help prevent the secondary bacterial infections that can happen. You're not the first person to go through this by bringing home new chickens. This breeder should have never sold you those chickens. Return them to him, and do ask for money back. Or kill them yourself, and incinerate or bury them very deeply. Don't assume that your others have it yet.
     
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  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Cullamycin will treat coryza.
     
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  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  8. ChelseysChicken

    ChelseysChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Took the birds back got $ back but I'm still furious ad paranoid about the rest of my birds. I did have the sick pair in their own pen so fingers crossed the whole flock didn't pick It up
     
  9. ChelseysChicken

    ChelseysChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Clean with
    clean with bleach?
     

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